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mechanical skills producing campaign furniture and they were now applying the same skills to the metamorphic designs. Many of these novel designs were made by a small number of patent furniture manufacturers centred on Catherine Street and the Strand (Figure 11).


Figure 11 – The Strand by C.R. Stanley ca. 1824 Source: Museum of London


Thomas Gale, of the Strand, patented a folding bedstead in 1772 which closed up to resemble a bookcase or wardrobe (Patent No. 1002). In 1805, William Pocock of nearby Southampton Street registered a design for an extending dining table (Patent No. 2895) and, five years later, in 1810, Charles Stewart, a few hundred yards away in St. Martins Lane, also patented an extending table design (Patent No. 3339). Pocock in addition to manufacturing his patent extending table was also known to have made chamber horses (Figure 8a, p. 20)43. These chairs were sometimes referred to as „exercise chairs‟ and were particularly suitable for the over-indulgent upper and middle-classes that would spend hours bouncing up and down on the chair to „work off‟ the effects of their rich diets. Gale, Pocock and Stewart together with other patent furniture specialists including: Thomas Butler, George Pryer and Morgan & Sanders were extremely active in the field of patent furniture


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