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Ackermann started to publish The Repository in 1809, many new designs started to appear alongside some of the „old favourites‟. These included library tables and stands with adjustable slopes that could hold a book at the right angle. Reading chairs26 (Figure 9a), absent from Sheraton‟s Dictionary published in 1803, graced the pages of The Repository in 1810. By 1811 the table-based Library Step designs (Figure 9b) described by Sheraton in detail in the second edition of his Drawing-Book eighteen years earlier, had been joined by the Metamorphic Library Chair.


Figure 9 – Specialised Library Furniture


Sources: Rudolph Ackermann’s Repository (September 1810, pl. 15, p. 182) and Sheraton’s Drawing-Book (Appendix pl. 5, pp. 9-11 and pl. 22, pp. 42-43)


During the last quarter of the eighteenth century, Robert Campbell (1774) had patented several designs for Library Steps including concealed-step variations of most tables, chests of drawers, chairs and stools. There is evidence that Thomas Chippendale also made a stool containing Library Steps for Harewood House in Yorkshire about this time27. It is interesting to note how the designs of Library Steps had captured the imagination of the Georgian cabinet-makers. By 1788 Campbell‟s patent had expired and this seemed to prompt a new wave of metamorphic furniture innovation. During the twenty years that followed, library ladders and steps in a plethora of new shapes and sizes started to appear. Thomas Jefferson recorded


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