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embarking on grand tours, building collections of antiquities and stocking their libraries with the latest reference works. Well acquainted with classical architecture and keen to display their new found knowledge, the stately homes of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland created a new and exciting market for the early nineteenth century cabinet-makers. It was Ackermann, an immigrant lithographer from Germany, who published one of the first interior design and fashion periodicals in response to this demand. Ackermann‟s Repository was published from 1809 to 1828 and it soon reached a circulation of two thousand. In addition to the publishing business, Ackermann sold decorative prints, stationery and watercolour paints from his shop in the Strand (Figure 6).


Figure 6 – Ackermann’s Room by C.A. Pugin ca. 1809 Source: V&A (Museum No. E.3027-1903)


According to Pauline Agius and Stephen Jones (1984) The Repository „devoted space to all things fashionable and every month for almost twenty years the magazine included hand-coloured17 plates of furniture, drapery and interiors‟. Although many features of the Trafalgar Chair had already appeared in The Recueil before 1805 and in the publications of Thomas Hope and George Smith soon after, it would be on the pages of The Repository that the wealthy middle and upper class readers of London, Manchester and Liverpool would catch their first glimpse of the


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