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of household furnishings; Ackermann notes, „The curious evolutions which may thus easily be performed in this chair, render it the means of very considerable amusement‟. Ackermann then added, „it would not be difficult to contrive an arrangement for moving these wheels, or winch handles, by the action of a very small and portable steam-engine, to render it a most curious mode of quick conveyance, without the agency of animal labour‟. It would be another fifty years before this became a reality and the day of the horse-drawn carriage was under threat but the combination of fine cabinet-work, pulleys, springs and catches no longer presented an obstacle to the imagination.


The poor quality of furniture in many inns prompted some travellers to take their campaign beds with them when they were away on business (Phillips, 1979). Following the defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo, The Duke of Wellington deemed his camp-bed so comfortable that he refused to sleep on anything else for the rest of his life. The connection between campaign and domestic furniture was aptly illustrated by William Pocock, a patent furniture manufacturer based in Southampton Street when, in an advertisement ca. 1810, he suggested that his knock-down furniture was, „so astonishingly simple, and the scale so variable as to suit either the Cottage Orneé [a small-scale villa] ... or the extensive Entertainments of the Nobility and Men of Fashion‟. This blend of form and mechanically-assisted functionality had captured the interest of the wealthy traveller and was fast becoming fashionable. But it was Ackermann, a pioneer of lithography and publisher of some of the best early colour printing in Britain, who produced the first monthly interior design magazine and popularised many of the new designs.


2.4 Fashion Magazines and the Trafalgar Chair


The early years of the nineteenth century were a period of immense change. Between 1801 and 1821 the population of London increased by forty-four percent to become the world‟s largest city. Despite the American War of Independence and the continuing conflicts with Napoleonic France, the United Kingdom mechanised its factories and extended trade in Asia. The combination of increased supply and demand underpinned by a strong political, financial and commercial infrastructure created new wealth and a new market for architecture and interior decoration. The emerging mercantile elite shared the aspirations of the English aristocracy


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