This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
The Seven Years‟ War between France and England ended in 1763, sixteen years before Roentgen arrived in Paris, and French furniture designs were, once again, highly fashionable in London. Several cabinet-makers working in the city at this time modelled their designs on those of their French counterparts and a number of interesting mechanical furniture combinations started to emerge. Arnold Frederick Beck, who described himself as a „Musical Instrument Maker and Cabinet Maker‟, was producing commodes in the French style around 1772 and, a few years later, he was even advertising dual-purpose „piano fortes in commodes‟ (Streeter, 1971, p. 422). Immigrant French cabinet-makers such as John Meschain and François Hervé were also making mechanical furniture in London at this time. Although it was Robert Campbell who patented the Library Step Table in 1774, several Meschain & Hervé marked examples are known to exist including one held in storage at the V&A in London (Ref. W.7-1932)15. There is also a reference to a marked Library Step Table containing the inscription „Hervé Fecit. No 32, John Street. Tottenham Court Road‟ in Christopher Gilbert‟s „Pictorial Dictionary of Marked London Furniture 1700-1840‟ (Gilbert, 1996, p. 265). The Latin word „Fecit‟ in this context has been used in place of the term „he made‟.


2.3 Military Campaigns, Grand Tours and Patent Furniture


According to Nicholas Brawer (2001, p.19), British officers with a high social position during the eighteenth and early nineteenth century „took it for granted that when they set out on a military campaign in Africa or India they could enjoy the same standard of living as they did at home‟. The furniture that accompanied them while they were „away on campaign‟ included chairs, sofas, dining tables and even four-poster beds. By necessity, these items were designed to be portable and, while they reflected the style of the period, they could also be „flat-packed‟ for ease of transportation. This „flat-pack‟ or „knock-down‟ furniture, as it was then known, was also popular for anyone travelling by sea and some items were designed to be multi-purpose to save space. Campaign furniture was also available in France and several designs first appeared in „L'Art du Menuisier Ebéniste‟ (The Art of the Cabinet-Maker) by André Jacob Roubo published between 1769 and 1775 (Rieder, 1995, pp. 101-106). In Thomas Sheraton‟s, „The Cabinet Dictionary‟ (The Dictionary) published in 1803, the requirements of camp furniture were described as, „each of them [is] required to be


- 12 -


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136