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brothers extended way beyond architecture and furnishings. During the latter half of the eighteenth century Josiah Wedgwood, quick to recognise the opportunity, applied many of Adam‟s motifs to his new range of Jasper Ware. Within a few years, the first wave of the neo-classical movement in Great Britain was well underway. But a second wave had already started to develop across the English Channel and within a few years the Adam Style would give way to the bold straight lines and symbolic ornamentation of the French Empire Style.


2.2 Design Influences of the French Courts


Following the deposition of Louis XVI in 1792, the newly formed French Republic under the control of the Directory shunned the opulent Rococo decoration of the aristocracy and adopted the revolutionary, classical motifs of earlier Egyptian, Greek and Roman civilisations. By the time Napoleon Bonaparte assumed the role of First Consul in 1799, Greco-Roman design was firmly established in the French court. Jacques-Louis David, an artist and leading revolutionary, directed the arts on behalf of the French Republic and was soon favoured by Napoleon. It was David who introduced the architects Charles Percier and Pierre François Léonard Fontaine (Percier & Fontaine) to Napoleon. As Napoleon‟s personal architects, Percier & Fontaine designed everything from the layout of his buildings to his furniture and wallpaper. Together they wrote several books on architecture and design and they became the leading exponents of the French neo-classical style. It was their serialised „Recueil de Décorations Intérieures‟ (Collection of Interior Decorations – The Recueil), which premiered in 1801 and was issued as a complete volume in 1812, that became a major influence on the French Empire Style3.


The designs of Percier & Fontaine were popularised and extended by Pierre Antoine Leboux de La Mésangère in the „Journal des Dames et des Modes‟4 (Magazine for Fashionable Ladies). Between 1802 and 1835 Pierre de La Mésangère published his own collection of furniture designs, „Collection des Meubles et Objets de Goût‟ (Collection of Furniture and Objects of Taste) and the characteristics of the Empire Style started to emerge. Style vectors included: the importance of balance and proportion, geometric forms, linear decoration, pedestals, pillars and volutes - many of the design features that would later be expressed in the form of the Regency period Metamorphic Library Chair. Percier & Fontaine had already reintroduced the


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