This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
55 Replacement hinges should have been made to fit the existing recesses but hinges of a different size have been used and the poor restoration has damaged


some of the surrounding structure. 56 Billiards was played in the court of Louis XI during the fifteenth century. The eighteenth century version involved a large table where the balls passed through arches to score points. Trou Madam was a separate game to billiards often played by the ladies while the gentlemen played billiards. Gillows supplied a „Troumadame


Table‟ for Tatton Park in December 1811. 57 The over-scrolled back was introduced in France ca. 1787. 58 Baywood is a soft, light mahogany that grows in the Bay of Honduras. The wood


was cheaper and easier to work than the closer grained Spanish mahogany and was often used on hidden parts of the furniture such as the steps of the Metamorphic


Library Chair. 59 The journeyman Edward Pye worked on several pieces of furniture at Tatton Park including a wardrobe and a set of four „Edwards Pattern‟ library chairs. The chairs had a twisted reed design on the back rail. Edward Pye‟s name is also recorded


against earlier pieces in the Sketch Books from 1805. 60 Such a large reduction in the cost of external labour suggests improvements in the


methods of manufacture. 61 The sale took place on January 29, 1998. Christie‟s estimated that the chair would sell for between £1,000 and £1,400 but bidding closed at £6,800. Interestingly, an almost identical chair was auctioned by Christie‟s on June 14, 2001. This time the catalogue claimed that the chair had once belonged to Ann Jessop, the successor to the cabinet-maker James Jessop of Sheffield in 1839. This time the estimate was


between £7,000 and £10,000 and bidding closed at £11,750. 62 These chairs, according to Nicholas Goodison and John Hardy (1970), were supplied to Tatton Park in 1811. They are described in a Gillows Account Book as „a set of twelve cane-seated library chairs‟. The invoice references an original design


created for Reverend H. Holland Edwards of Pennant in Wales. 63 Spanish mahogany is brighter, close-grained and often highly figured. It was the most expensive variety of mahogany and was used for the very best pieces. The closeness of the grain provided added strength to the chair, a feature that would appeal to Gillows in view of the fragility of the basic design and its intended purpose.


- 119 -


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136