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18 This style of chair was often referred to as the Trafalgar Chair during the second decade of the nineteenth century. Morgan & Sanders had furnished Lord Nelson‟s cabin on HMS Victory and they renamed their ware-room „Trafalgar House‟ in 1809. Some furniture historians believe that there is a direct link between the name of the chair and the Morgan & Sanders ware-room, crediting them with the design. It is also tempting to speculate that the design was a favourite of Lord Nelson. The sabre- shaped legs could have provided extra on-board stability and the nautical motifs such as rope-twist carvings were certainly added to the chair at this time but there is


no direct evidence of a Morgan & Sanders connection. 19 The London Chair Maker‟s and Carver‟s Book of Prices for Workmanship was an annual publication commissioned and distributed by the „Committee of Master Chair- Manufacturers and Journeymen‟. It was a trade catalogue offering recommended


prices for labour and materials. 20 Jane Austen published Sense and Sensibility in 1811. 21 The Sophie Von La Roche reference to Lüttich is simply the German name for the


city of Liege in Belgium where John Joseph Merlin was born. 22 James Wyatt was a contemporary of Henry Holland but he detested both Palladian


and Adam Style architecture. According to Elizabeth Burton in „The Georgians at Home‟ (Burton, 1967, p. 100), James Wyatt became so popular that „he took on


more work than he could handle and often drove his clients to despair‟. 23 Other suppliers included George Simson of St. Paul‟s Church Yard who made


„mechanical organ secretaries‟ for Thomas Weeks (Gilbert, 1996, p. 6). 24 While the aristocrats and merchants furnished their libraries others lived in abject poverty and according to Elizabeth Burton in her book entitled, „The Georgians at Home‟, in Manchester during the latter years of the eighteenth century, „it was not


uncommon for ten people to be living in one room‟ (Burton, 1967, p. 87). 25 Books during this period were relatively expensive with a three volume novel


costing up to £2.00, the price of a custom-made chair. 26 The design of the Reading Chair allowed a gentleman to sit with his coat-tails


hanging down the front of the chair to avoid unsightly creases. 27 The Library Step Stool at Harewood House was made together with a Writing Table in the same English Empire Style. In the Day Work Book for the estate Mr. Reid (Chippendale‟s Foreman) records, „making covers for Library Table and Stool‟.


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