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Chippendale, ten years his senior, to help him furnish his first independent contract at Dumfries House in Scotland and, it was there that the trust between the two men was established. On subsequent commissions, including the work at Harewood House in Yorkshire, Adam could rely on the judgment of Chippendale1. Adam‟s neo- classical influence is abundantly clear in the contrast between the design publications of Chippendale and Hepplewhite. Chippendale‟s, „The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker‟s Director‟ (The Director), had preceded his partnership with Adam, but The Guide first published by A. Hepplewhite and Co. in 1788, was packed with Adam‟s neo-classical motifs and became instrumental in converting many of Adam‟s designs (Figure 3a) into furniture patterns that could be copied by the chair-makers of London (Figure 3b). Hepplewhite‟s adaptations of the „Adam Style‟ are evident on most pages of The Guide from the vase-shaped pediments on the bookcases and chests of drawers to the ribbons and festoons on the shield-back chairs.


Figure 3 – Interpretation of the Adam Style Sources: Adam’s Works and Hepplewhite’s Guide (pl. 2d)


Thomas Sheraton2 was also a great admirer of the Adam Style and many of the illustrations in „The Cabinet-Maker and Upholsterer‟s Drawing-Book‟ (The Drawing- Book) contain references to the stylised swags and floral-paterae made popular by Robert Adam and his brother almost twenty years earlier. The influence of the Adam


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