This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
10.4 Notes


1 Examples of the collaboration between Robert Adam and Thomas Chippendale can be found at Nostell Priory and Harewood House in Yorkshire. 2 Opinion is divided but most furniture historians now agree that Thomas Sheraton


was not a practicing cabinet-maker. In the Drawing-Book, Sheraton often references other makers but there are no examples of his own manufacture. In The Dictionary under the heading of „Carver‟, Sheraton mentions that he was trained in the „ingenious art‟ of carving and was „employed in the country occasionally‟ in this capacity but there is no record of his workshop and nothing has ever been attributed


to him. He died penniless in 1806. 3 Napoleon had declared himself Emperor in 1804 and the neo-classical design, of


Napoleon‟s ascendance, was soon to be referred to as the „Empire Style‟. 4 The „Journal des Dames et des Modes‟ was the most influential women‟s fashion magazine in Paris between 1797 and 1839. This journal under the management of Pierre de La Mésangère contained regular features illustrating the latest furniture


designs based on the work of Charles Percier & Pierre Fontaine and others. 5 The „exaggerated‟ voluted arms that appear during the first few years of the nineteenth century are thought to be an English invention. The first examples appear


on a chair made for Carlton House in 1805 (Musgrave, 1961, p. 95). 6 Although there is no evidence to suggest that „The London Tradesman‟ was written by the same Robert Campbell that patented the Library Steps in 1774, there is a distinct possibility. „The London Tradesman‟ was compiled by Campbell to provide „Advice to Parents in what manner to discover and improve the Natural Genius of their children, before they put them out Apprentices to any particular Trade, Mystery or Profession‟ and he appears to have an excellent understanding of cabinet-making


and the furniture trade. 7 Carlton House was on the south side of Pall Mall where Carlton House Terrace now stands. When the building was demolished in 1827, most of the furniture and paintings were moved to Buckingham Palace and many of the doors in the house were re-used at Windsor. The portico of Carlton House was donated to the National Gallery. A manuscript inventory of the contents of Carlton House drawn up in 1826 is preserved at Windsor Castle.


- 113 -


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136