This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Metamorphic – Used to describe a piece of furniture where the same structure can be reused in an alternative form e.g. the Library Step Chair where the seat of the chair is also used as one of the steps or a chair table where the back of the chair is reconfigured to provide the top of the table. A metamorphic piece is, by definition, a dual or multi-purpose item.


Over-scrolled – The name used to describe the outward scrolling of a chair arm or the upper edge of a top-rail to imitate the shape of ancient Greek couches.


Patent Furniture – The word „patent‟ was used to represent mechanically assisted knock-down and multi-purpose furniture during the early nineteenth century regardless of any formal patent protection. A „patent‟ bedstead or chair would arouse considerably more interest than a run-of-the-mill alternative and the term was often used as a marketing ploy.


Patera or Paterae (plural) – An applied circular or oval decorative feature representing a shallow Greek dish used for drinking wine. Many paterae designs were discovered during the early excavations of Pompeii. Paterae with a floral design are often referred to as rosettes.


Rails – The frame sections of a chair including: front-rail, side-rail and top-rail. The top-rail is sometimes referred to as the crest-rail or yoke.


Reeding – A surface pattern often applied to the edges of Regency period furniture to represent a tight bundle of reeds or canes.


Sabre-legs – The term used during the early nineteenth century to describe the concave curve of the Regency Style chair legs.


Tablet Top-rail – A rectangular chair rail used to support the back. These chairs were often referred to as having a „tablet top‟ during the Regency.


Upright – The vertical members of the chair that provide support for the backrest and top-rail. The uprights of the Trafalgar Chair were an extension of the rear legs.


Voluted arms – The spiral-shaped arms of a chair based on the ancient Greek capitals of the ionic, Corinthian and Composite orders.


- 112 -


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136