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10.3 Glossary


Many of the cabinet-making and chair-making terms used in the dissertation can be found in Sheraton‟s Dictionary published in 1803. Nevertheless, there are a small number of words, specific to the Regency Metamorphic Library Chair that may require further explanation and these are given below to avoid ambiguity:


Baywood – A wide-grained, soft mahogany that originated from the Bay of Honduras. Often used for hidden surfaces such as the library steps.


Curved-over Knee – The term given to the rounded tops of the front legs of a chair. The curved shape of the knee is usually extended across the length of the front-rail.


Dual or Multi-purpose – Used in connection with a piece of furniture that serves more than one purpose e.g. a night table where a small bedside cabinet conceals a chamber pot.


Flame Veneer – A veneer of finely figured timber taken from near the root of the tree or the junction of a branch.


Fluting – A series of parallel concave channels carved into the surface to represent the vertical patterns used on ancient Greek columns. During the last ten years of the eighteenth century reeding became more popular than fluting.


Journeyman – A chair or cabinet-maker that had served a full apprenticeship and was qualified to manufacture an item without supervision. Most journeymen were self-employed and they were paid a fee for each item they manufactured. According to Pat Kirkham, less than one percent of furniture making masters and apprentices were women during the eighteenth century (Kirkham, 1988, p. 4). Nevertheless terms such as journeymen, craftsmen etc. are assumed to include female members of the trade.


Klismos – A style of chair used in ancient Greece from the fifth century BCE. The concave back and sabre-shaped legs allowed a more natural posture.


Knock-down – The term applied to furniture that can be disassembled and packed into a box for ease of transportation. Typically, the legs of chairs and tables could be unscrewed. The principle is similar to the flat-pack furniture of today.


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