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Evidence has also been discovered that questions the accuracy of published information relating to the Morgan & Sanders chair at Trinity College Oxford. An attribution by G. Bernard Hughes (1967, p. 453) based on a Morgan & Sanders nameplate must be re-examined following a forensic inspection of the chair. The chair no longer carries the maker‟s mark and while the design features of the chair are consistent with those expected of Morgan & Sanders, Hughes‟ discovery of a nameplate describing the firm as „carpenters and manufacturers‟ throws doubt on the original attribution. Hughes‟ research is frequently referenced by dealers and auction houses and has also been quoted in other published works on the subject. The results of continuing investigations at Tatton Park will also help to clarify the identity of the Trinity College chair and new evidence will be made generally available to improve the quality of the research available.


In addition it has also been possible to conclude that:


1. The Library Chair was patented by Robert Campbell in 1774, thirty seven years before the Regency, but there is no evidence that a dual-purpose chair became popular until the second decade of the nineteenth century.


Patents registered during the eighteenth century expired after a period of fourteen years but Campbell, who was still trading in Marylebone Street during 1788, failed to extend the patent. Few chairs were made to Campbell‟s original specifications and it was not until the Trafalgar Chair based version appeared in 1811 that the design became popular. The Regency period interpretation was made for over twenty years; the majority during the second decade of the nineteenth century. Based on an extrapolation of the number of chairs passing through the trade and those recorded in known collections, it is estimated that there are four hundred Regency period Metamorphic Library Chairs in circulation.


2. While other cabinet-makers produced Metamorphic Library Chairs during the nineteenth century, Morgan & Sanders and Gillows are the only firms that left documentary evidence relating to their designs.


Ackermann‟s illustrations of a Morgan & Sanders chair in 1811 and Gillows‟ Sketch Book entries during 1815 and 1834 provide the only evidence that links


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