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oppy cards, red roses and a box of expensive chocolates. Only one day springs to mind


when you think of all these things, Valentines Day. February 14 is definitely the most romantic date of the year, meaning that this month is all about love. But love isn‘t an emotion experienced just by


humans. The animals of the world feel love just as much


we do and would like to have that special someone by their side just like us. That‘s why at the National Animal Welfare


Trust in Watford, staff try their best to pair up the animals that preferably like to live in twos. The NAWT is a large re-homing centre that looks after many homeless animals, including guinea pigs. These furry little friends make ideal pets as


their small size and quiet sociable nature ensures that they‘re manageable to look after. Guinea pigs do like to talk and can be very vocal with lots of different sounds and parents often consider them as a first pet for their


children. Their bedding should consist of hay or straw,


and in keeping with the romantic theme, guinea pigs like to cuddle up to each other in their own special hiding place. But when it comes to having a kiss, this may


be a problem as their teeth grow continuously throughout their life (not so romantic!) and therefore, as they are herbivores, guinea pigs should be given grass or grass hay to eat as it takes them a long time to chew. As well as this, guinea pigs also enjoy some


variety in their diet, so if you‘re hot on having your five a day, so will they as they like to eat fresh leafy green vegetables like broccoli and carrot tops to eat, and also citrus fruits, which are rich in vitamin c. So if you‘re feeling all loved up this February,


why not consider bringing a new pet home to love? While you‘re giving you‘re loved one a bunch of


flowers on the 14th, think of the lovely guinea pigs at the NAWT, cuddled up together in their warm bed, nibbling carrot tops for tea and waiting for that special someone to take them to their forever home. For more information visit www.nawt.org.uk or call the NAWT on 020 8950 0177.


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