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OUR TRANSITION FROM OIL DEPENDENCY TO LOCAL RESILIENCE


W


hen people ask ―What is the Transition Towns movement?‖ I wonder whether to


explain about ―peak oil‖ and the 85,000,000 barrels of oil we consume each day globally, or perhaps the importance of shopping locally and supporting our farmers, especially since the average age of UK farmers is 55 and we will need another 60,000 to replace those who are likely to retire within the next decade. Or perhaps I should discuss the effects of


climate change which appear to be manifesting in our erratic weather patterns and affecting most significantly those who are least able to cope economically and whose lifestyles have least impact on our environment. Yet I think that the ―transition movement‖ is


most clearly encapsulated in my five year old son‘s grin in a photograph I took last summer as he proudly showed off his raised bed in our back garden, brimming with green life. The beetroots he planted with his own hands from seeds in the springtime. Yes, ―transition‖ is to me is the planting of a seed in the fertile soil of the community, tending it and having faith that that seed will germinate and grow. Transition reminds us that we are not, despite


the prevailing message of our culture, merely consumers. We can make powerful choices to


live more fulfilling and connected lives and we can do this by supporting local systems, that are not ―oil hungry‖ and unsustainable. Abbots Langley Transition Town Association


(ALTTA), a non profit group, was formed last year to help our village respond to these concerns. Abbots Langley is very fortunate that it has so many groups which make up a rich tapestry of resources and expertise and so ALTTA have organised a free entry public event on Saturday 5 March from 10.30am to 12.30pm at the Henderson Hall, to encourage the growth of these groups and raise awareness of the transition movement and how we might respond to these concerns collectively, positively and creatively. Projects that may emerge are a garden share


scheme, local exchange system, seed swap, creative waste reuse scheme and encouraging a network of local craft workers/growers. Please cut out the ticket opposite and bring it


to the event to enter into a prize draw. Among the prizes are two boxes of local, seasonal fruit and vegetables sourced from within 30 miles of Abbots Langley and a meal for two at Hunters Bar, Hunton Bridge. To find out more about ALTTA visit www.altta.org.uk or call 01923 291273. By Ian Bond


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