This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
I


no longer have a child at primary school, but as a governor and local councillor and with


plenty of friends and neighbours with primary- aged children, I still have a strong interest in local school provision. So I was disappointed and angered by the comments made last month by Hertfordshire County Council in response to the planning application for the Leavesden Aerodrome site. It has become obvious that there are not


enough primary school places in the area. Large developments locally have put pressure on existing schools and this situation has not been helped by the closure of one form of entry at each of Alban Wood and Leavesden Green schools. The ‗excess‘ space at Alban Wood has now had houses built on it, meaning that there are even more children needing local schools. Only two months ago, the county council told


me that the shortage in primary school places would be only for the school year 2012-13. The figures given in the consultation to increase Tanners Wood School by 0.5 forms of entry (FE) agree with this and show a shortage of just eight places the following year. The county council said that this small deficit would continue. However, at the same time that the county


council was claiming only a small shortage of places, they were telling a different story to Three Rivers Council. The county council informed Three Rivers that ‗there is current demand for school places in this area which amounts to 1 FE, some of which is attributable to a wider area including parts of North Watford. It is forecast that the level of demand will continue for the foreseeable future’. The county council also wants to set up a ‗reserve capacity of 0.7 FE over and above the existing requirement ... to


allow for parental preference and volatility to cater for known demand‘. The county council also informed Three Rivers


that the new houses proposed for the area would also lead to greater need for school places: firstly stating that this would need an extra 0.7 FE and then in the last month increasing this to 1 FE. That adds up to a total of 2.7 FE for this area. The county council have stated that they want a brand new 2 FE school ‗at the northern part of the Leavesden Aerodrome site‘. It seems that the county council are not at all


clear about how many school places they need and where those prospective pupils will come from. We know that there is a shortage of places in


north Watford, some of it caused by the county council selling off the old Leggatts school site. There is also a shortage of primary school places in the Kings Langley area, equal to 1 FE, which appears to have been added into the Abbots Langley area figures, thus inflating them. It is important that Abbots Langley children


can get a place at an Abbots Langley primary school. The ability to be able to walk to school, go round to friends easily after school and to take part in extra-curricular activities is important for them. But we should not be expected to find places for children to be driven in from elsewhere. The county council can re-open a second form of entry at Leavesden Green school and should place the remainder of the places needed on some of the land already they own in the area. This issue is likely to take many months to


resolve and we will press for public consultation and involvement every step of the way. It‘s vital for local children that we get it right.


66


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100