This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
His barrister John Hilton QC alleged that


while they were cutting up drugs in Grimes' flat they had become involved in an argument. He claimed Khaliq had gone for Grimes with a knife, causing a cut to his hand. He said Grimes had taken the knife from him and caused the fatal injuries, including wounds to his heart and aorta.


‘Grimes showed no mercy to his


victim. Not only did he kill him, he attempted to conceal what he had done.’


Mrs Evans said that after the killing Grimes


had gone to Asda in north Watford and bought cleaning products including latex gloves, Cillit Bang, bleach, Vanish and Fairy, to remove blood from the flat. But after his arrest police found extensive


spots of blood in the lounge/bedroom of Grimes' flat. Early on 15 July - five days after the killing -


the body was transferred up the M1. Grimes pulled the body from the boot of the car and at around 2.40 in the morning O'Brien used a works digger to dig a trench.


Grimes himself had


dropped the murder weapon down a drain near his home in Abbots Langley. Khaliq was reported


missing to the Met Police on Thursday July 15 2010. Police contacted his associates and Grimes was arrested. O'Brien admitted his role and took officers to the grave. Detective


Chief


Wayne Grimes has been jailed for life.


Inspector Mark Ross from the Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Major Crime Unit led the investigation and said: ―Wayne Grimes showed no mercy to his victim. Not only did he kill him, he attempted to conceal what he had done. ―The Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Major


Crime Unit are dedicated to bringing offenders of serious crimes to justice and I am pleased that the sentencing of Wayne Grimes reflects the seriousness of the crime.‖ Zafar Khaliq‘s sons said: ―He was a great dad and we miss him very much. It is a big loss.‖


5


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100