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POLICING PLAN IS „VAGUE AND UNSPECIFIC‟


P


arish Councillors in Abbots Langley are disappointed with an ‗unambitious‘ Police


plan outlining the force‘s fight against crime in the village. The draft Policing Plan drawn up by


Hertfordshire Police Authority was criticised at a meeting last month for its lack of specific targets. Leader of the Parish Council, Sara Bedford,


explained why the plan has left her and her colleagues underwhelmed. She said: ―We have no gripes about the local police and PCSOs who are very responsive to the local community and are held in high regard by many people in Abbots. ―It is really unambitious. For example it talks


about ‗crime not rising‘ rather than aiming to reduce it. Also it states that it hopes to maintain the detection rate but not improve it. There is lots of talk about what it is going to do but doesn‘t say how they are going to do it. It‘s vague and unspecific.‖ A spokeswoman from Hertfordshire Police


Authority said: ―"The document referred to by Abbots Langley Parish Council is a draft outline Policing Plan, which was circulated to all local authorities and partner organisations in the


county in December, asking for views and comments. We have not received any feedback direct from the Parish Council, but would reassure them and your readers that the full Plan will contain information on the how the objectives will be met. ―Hertfordshire is one of the top performing


forces in the country and our aim is to keep it that way, despite having to find £36m in savings over the next four years to bridge the Government funding gap." The issue is raised at a time when the council‘s


budget for dealing with vandalism looks set to rise by more than £880 by the end of this financial year. The cost of criminal damage to the village is expected to be around £4,150, up from the original estimate of £3,270.


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