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Stephen Lisk,


director at One Eighty Light, discusses the factors affecting good lighting.


There are two forces potentially conspiring against good lighting at the moment. The first is the economic downturn and the second, if we're not careful, is energy legislation. As bottom lines are scrutinised and budgets slashed, there is always the danger that essential skills and services, such as professional lighting designers, are dispensed with or specifications compromised, if not downright ignored. The upshot is inferior lighting that may have been cheaper upfront but which doesn't deliver on performance, maintenance, appearance or longevity. The changes to Part L of the Building Regulations, which came into force in October, have also provoked discussion about the impact of this and other increasingly draconian legislation on the quality of lighting. No one would argue that we must cut energy usage. Everyone realises that targets will only get tougher. The problem is, first, whether the legislation has got it right in the way it quantifies energy loads and, second, that unspecialised


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specifiers concentrate so much on number crunching and box ticking that they ignore the overall lighting picture. A lighting professional, on the other hand, sees energy saving as an integral part of a multifaceted whole, not as a goal in itself.


‘The consequence of good lighting should be energy savings,' former BDP Lighting director Barrie Wilde once said. 'After all, one of the best ways to save energy is to turn the lights off. It’s not good lighting though.’ Alan Tulla, in his Presidential address to the Society of Light and Lighting AGM in May said: ‘I doubt there are any lighting professionals who think the system efficiency measures as delivered lumens/watt is a good measure of lighting quality. And power density targets are based on installed load rather than energy consumed; so much for well thought out design and the use of lighting controls! Shouldn’t simple lighting control be the software behind the lighting equipment hardware? Lighting professionals understand that it


should be about a lighting design that embraces lighting quality and it is this quality driven approach that will lead to greater energy savings. Tulla advocates the EN 15193 LENI based system, (Lighting Energy Numeric Indicator) long since championed in the past by Lou Bedocs at Thorn Lighting as something we here in the UK should adopt. About time. The real bottom line is that lighting


professionals are needed more than ever before. That way clients will ensure they have long-term sustainable, cost-effective, easily maintained and quality lighting schemes.


Stephen Lisk FSLL is Chairman of the Society of Light and Lighting’s Communications Committee. He is an Immediate Past President of the Society and Director at One Eighty Light.


Contact


One Eighty Light 07590 828 602 www.oneeightylight.com www.a1lightingmagazine.com


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Having an effect


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