This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
i t o


Sally Storey, design director at John Cullen Lighting and Lighting Design International, runs through what to consider when specifying kitchen lighting.


Far more than a functional space for preparing food and cooking, these days the kitchen is regarded as the heart of the home and the centre of family life. Often an inclusive open-plan space, a kitchen may be required to double as a place for eating, relaxing and doing homework or other chores.


The first thing to consider when lighting a kitchen is to remember that it needs to be bright at times for cooking and chopping, but also at night, if combined with a dining area, it needs to be soft and intimate. If combined with a central island there are always ways this can be glamorously lit.


24


Always remember in a kitchen that exposed fittings collect the grime which cooking creates so, if at all possible, opt for recessed or semi-recessed fittings. The latest LED technologies have given extra scope to the designer. Below I have listed some simple ideas:


1. To provide a fresh feel consider uplighting from the top of the units – ideal in basement kitchens. This can be achieved by using the LED Streamer 10W/m from John Cullen Lighting. This is also ideal to use under the kitchen cabinets as a task light, but only if the work top is matt; a polished work top will


reflect a whole line of LED dots, which is not so attractive.


2. For a more dramatic and changing effect consider a back lit splash back that could literally change to any colour to suit any mood. The RGB Slinky has a slim profile so is ideal for concealing behind a glass splashback. You can choose to have just one colour or have the colour scroll for a multitude of colours.


3. Recessed downlights are a good solution, but forget using them in a plain grid! Think of what needs to be lit, i.e.


www.a1lightingmagazine.com


C


o


g


p o


k m


n


u


a


s r


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68