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masculinity, slavery, and the history of photography. Specialized interests in the forms of public intimacy in American life and the place of poverty in the formation of twentieth century American nationhood. He is the author of Littery Man: Mark Twain and Modern Authorship (1996).


John Noell Moore is Professor of Education/Secondary English at the College of William and Mary, where he teaches courses in English Methods, Planning Instruction in English, Literature for Adults, and Current Issues in Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment. He is the author of Interpreting Young Adult Literature: Literary Theory in the Secondary Classroom (1997), and John Marsden: Darkness, Shadow, and Light (2010) as well as numerous articles on English studies and English teaching. His research focuses on ways of interpreting young adult literature from multiple theoretical perspectives; most recently he has begun working on the postmodern young adult novel and the challenges of teaching postmodern texts. He also supervises student teaching internships and conducts the internship seminar.


Maria Elena Pada is the Coordinator of the Academic Information Services. As the coordinator of AIS, she is dedicated to continue to support the effective integration of technology into all aspects of teaching and learning at the College of William & Mary. As a member of AIS, she is expected to be part of a team that encourages faculty to create better learning environments and hopefully, improve educational outcomes. To accomplish these goals she participates alongside the other members of AIS in promoting and helping with the exploration, implementation, and evaluation of existing and emerging technologies.


Gene Roche is director of Academic Information Services and Executive Professor in the School of Education at William and Mary. He is responsible for working with the academic technologists, engineers and the lab-classroom team to help enhance teaching and learning at the College. The AIS group provides discipline-specific support for instruction and research in the social sciences, humanities, physical and life sciences, School of Education, and the School of Law. Members of the AIS staff also manage a portfolio of institutional and individual projects to leverage technology in improving instruction and research.


Betsy Schroeder is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the History Department and American Studies Program. She teaches diverse students in Freshmen Writing Seminars, lecture courses in African American and US History, as well as undergraduate and graduate special topics seminars in American Studies. One of her pedagogical interests include teaching writing across the collegiate experience and looking at graduate level writing as a culmination of the collaborative writing process. Her research interests include aesthetics, literature, urban issues, geography, and African American Studies.


Tammy Thrift is the Senior Academic Technologist for the School of Education, a new role that seems almost tailor-made. Her approach is to promote technology as an innovative tool to broaden learning potential -- with instructional objectives as the driving force for technology integration.


Sharon Zuber teaches in the English Department and the Film Studies Program at the College of William and Mary. As director of the Writing Resources Center, she trains students for peer tutoring and works with faculty on integrating writing into their courses. Her research interests focus on nonfiction writing and documentary filmmaking, both of which she believes highlight the importance of process and collaboration. One of her favorite activities is talking about teaching writing.


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