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By shifting – or sharing – the construction of knowledge within the classroom, we


have found it useful to think about our role in terms of ―facilitator‖ or ―project manager‖ – the person who must oversee the logistics, as well as the content, of a project. According to Joanna Wolfe (2010), author of Team Writing: A Guide to Working in Groups, ―the project manager needs to create a written task schedule that documents deadlines, tasks, and responsibilities‖ (p. 14). In fact, by creating a syllabus and writing up individual assignments, we do just that. Add to this list ―defining how a project will be evaluated,‖ and the description of our role is complete. The language that we use throughout this document is built on research in


composition studies and education as well as science and business. Wolfe’s (2010) research was funded by a National Science Foundation grant to study teams in technical writing and engineering classes, thus her term ―project manager.‖ We found that this interdisciplinary language brought new perspectives; new language revealed different ways to think about what we were doing and forced us to confront assumptions embedded in the language of our own disciplines. For this document to truly reflect the dynamics of collaborative writing, we imagine it being ―remixed‖ by our readers to fit specific teaching styles and course objectives. We hope you will embrace this challenge by talking about the ideas with your colleagues, reflecting and writing about the methods, adding assignments that worked (or didn’t), and sharing your expertise in collaborative writing. This manual begins with the last bullet listed above in under Faculty Roles in


Collaborative Writing, ―Planning, Facilitating, and Assessing Collaborative Writing‖. Our guide then provides four modules of specific gateways for integrating collaborative writing into your instruction: through single-author peer editing, through Google docs, through a wiki, and through a learning management system. We hope that you find this a helpful and practical guide that will assist you in trying out a new or remodeled teaching tool or strategy that might facilitate collaborative writing and learning in your classroom.


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