This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
classroom teaching. As a starting point, the information presented here may help build faculty confidence to explore the benefits of collaboration both in the classroom and in their own research. The subsequent modules include practical information on planning, facilitating, and assessing collaborative writing. There are four modules centered around specific gateways for collaborative writing, single author peer review, Google documents, wikis, and Blackboard, so that instructors might use all or some of the modules as a practical starting point for integrating collaborative writing into their teaching and coursework. We envision this as a process that will evolve and improve through reflective use with students in classrooms.


Faculty Roles in Collaborative Writing Prior to utilizing collaborative writing with students, faculty must consider the


pedagogy involved in managing this type of assignment and must reflect upon their own assumptions about teaching and learning. The following questions provide a starting point for faculty contemplating using student collaborative writing projects.  Acknowledging assumptions on knowledge building and ownership: Who owns the knowledge? What is the best way to build the knowledge?


 Reflecting upon teaching orientation: What kind of teacher am I? A content deliverer, a mentor, a learning architect (interested in cognition), a nurturer, or a champion of social justice? (See Pratt, 2002)


 Considering course and program objectives: Does collaborative writing support my learning goals?


 Evaluating the impact on teaching: How will collaborative writing impact my teaching? What are the ramifications for managing new types of grading? Can I find support for exploring collaborative writing?


 Planning, evaluating, and assessing Collaborative Writing: How will I plan and execute collaborative writing in my instruction?


Student Roles in Collaborative Writing Group work shifts the roles of students in the classroom. Students hold a responsibility to the group for the final project rather than only having an impact on an


11


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128