This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
multimedia production, to name a few. The modern digital working world enables writers to bridge physical gaps and collaborate not only with peers in the office, but also with colleagues around the globe. In academia as well, scholars are expected to collaborate with their colleagues in research and publication, for example, in peer reviewed journals (Creamer, 2004; Gappa, Austin, & Trice, 2007). If we intend to prepare our students for access into academia and the 21st century work place, we should consider integrating opportunities for collaborative writing within our classrooms. In addition to equipping our students for their academic and professional


pursuits, well facilitated collaboration can potentially increase the learning experience within our classrooms. Cooper, Robinson, and McKinney (1993) conducted a literature review on cooperative learning in the classroom and found that ―group learning is more effective than traditional methods in improving critical thinking, self-esteem, racial and ethnic relations, and positive social behavior‖ (as cited in Nilson, 2010, p. 156). Interaction among students builds relationships and provides a platform for sharing knowledge. As a form of group work, collaborative writing encourages students to actively engage, debate, critique, and reflect on the relevant content for a writing project. Collaborative writing also forces students to make decisions about what to include and what to exclude and what to merge. Figure 1.0 illustrates the process of collaborative writing. Thinking of writing as a process rather than simply a summative assessment helps in considering how the act of collaborative writing might engage students in knowledge building within our content areas. Finally, collaborative writing also allows for the process of group work and teambuilding in our classrooms. Students must consider differing perspectives and pool their talents and resources in order to achieve a common goal (Wolfe, 2010). Our students will be dealing with large and complex problems in their professional and academic pursuits and such large and complex problems land at the feet of the team rather than the individual.


9


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128