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by Mitchell Terpstra | mitch@revuewm.com THEATRE


RIVIERA THEATRE presents


SUPER BOWL XLV February 6 • 6 pm • FREE!


OSCAR-NOMINATED


SHORT FILMS LIVE ACTION


February 12 • 9 pm


February 15, 18 • 8:30 pm February 17, 19 • 6:30 pm March 5 • 1 pm


ANIMATED February 12 • 7 pm


February 15, 18 • 6:30 pm February 17, 19 • 8:30 pm March 5 • 3 pm


SHAKESPEARE IN CINEMA RIGOLETTO


ROMEO & JULIET


February 13 • 3 pm February 14 • 7 pm


OPERA IN CINEMA


February 16 • 7 pm February 20 • 3 pm


February 19 • 9 pm • No Cover!


THE PUNKNECKS CALIGULA


BALLET IN CINEMA


February 23 • 7 pm February 27 • 3 pm


BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATER February 25 • 7 pm


END OF REASON SIMON & GARFUNKEL’S


February 26 • 9 pm • $5 Live Music in the Bar EveryThursday!


Visit our website for more informa- tion about these and other events, as well as movie dates and showtimes .


50 North Main St. Three Rivers, MI (269) 278-8068 www.trriviera.com


50 | REVUEWM.COM | FEBRUARY 2011


gun down a deer this season, he’ll become the oldest Soady male in family history never to have achieved this rite of passage, forever nailing him to the Soady deer camp wall of shame. “Even if you don’t hunt or don’t believe


O


in hunting, this play is a laugh a minute,” says Director D. Terry Williams about Escanaba in Da Moonlight. Williams has directed this play once before in 2003. Escanaba in Da Moonlight, the first of a


trilogy written by Michigan’s own Jeff Daniels (remember Harry from Dumb and Dumber?), may or may not convert you into a bona fide blaze orange-wearing, rifle-toting buck-stalker. Nevertheless, after the play you’ll probably find yourself believing in things stranger than hunting. Competing superstitions surround opening day success, for instance. Reuben’s brother, Remnar Soady, a far


more accomplished hunter, swears by the rag- gedy flannel shirt he wears year after year. But with his man- hood is on the line, Reuben is desperate to try even older traditions, specifically those recommended by his Native American wife Wolf Moon Dance, who is also a far more accomplished hunter. Despite their skepticism, Reuben con- vinces the other hunters to try some seemingly harebrained rituals, including dousing themselves in porcupine piss and drinking a special concoction containing moose testicles. “The element of surprise is constant in


this play,” Williams said. “Daniels struck a beautiful balance between telling a story and


It’s ‘Man vs. Wild vs. Supernatural’ in Da U.P.


showing the eccentricity of family…You al- ways want to see a family kookier than yours.” Sparing you the long drive north through


ESCANABA IN DA MOONLIGHT Farmers Alley Theatre, Kalamazoo Feb. 4-6, 10-13, 17-20, show times at 2 and 8 p.m. $21-$25 farmersalleytheatre.com, (269) 343-2727


bitter winter, Escanaba is a rustic, uncivilized comedy that captures the idiosyncrasy of a place where opening day of deer season is an unofficial holiday. “Farmers Alley is the


perfect theatre for Escanaba,” Williams said. “Because of its intimate size, Farmers Alley puts you right in the cabin with the Soady family.” But you might not want


to sit too close to the action, as Reuben’s break with Soady


family traditions unleashes all sorts of strange phenomena. Family friend and fellow hunter Jimmy Negamanee—who claims that aliens once abducted him—arrives after his old car spontaneously catches fire and drives off on


its own. Euchre cards change before their eyes. Hurricane winds and blinding lights terrorize the ramshackle cabin. DNR Officer Tom from Detroit arrives claiming to have seen God up on the ridge, and mysterious spirits possess the men as they anticipate opening day. Sleep- deprived and scarred witless, can Reuben still possibly bag his buck? According to Williams, this long, wild


weekend is endured by a “dream cast” star- ring Ben Gougeon, Michael Ray Helms, Bruce Bennett, Mitch Voss, Tim Eschelbach and Anna Mundo. “They are the same age as the actors and


they’re Michiganders,” Williams says, “so they get the differences between the Upper and Lower Peninsula, as well as the conceit of being a Yooper.” n


H MASCULINE HOR- ROR of horrors! Reuben Soady is about to turn 35—and he still hasn’t bagged a buck. If Reuben—belittled around town as the “Buckless Yooper”—doesn’t


Other Theatre Events | by Andrea Filter


Opus Actors’ Theatre Grand Rapids (Spectrum Theater)


Feb 3-5, 8 p.m. Adults $24, students/seniors: $20, student RUSH: $10 (with valid Student ID: begins 45 minutes prior to curtain) actorstheatregrandrapids.org, (616) 234-3817


As a world-renowned string quartet struggles to prep for a show imperative to its future, it decides to fire the brilliant – but drama causing – violist. A youthful woman comes on as the replacement, and uses her talents to motivate the quartet to take on a musical act of epic magnitude.


As the stakes rise and the pressure is amplified watch the musicians as the take on clashing personalities, life, love, and, of course, music. Watch how violist-turned- playwright Michael Hollinger tactfully plays this familiar story right before your eyes.


Working Holland Civic Theatre


Feb. 3-7, 10-13, 17-19, show times at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Adults $18, seniors $16, students $10 hollandcivictheatre.org (616) 396-2021


Based on the bestselling book by Studs Terkel, the production Working musically explores 26 different American professions, including a schoolteacher, fireman, millworker, sailor, newsboy, housewife, and corporate executive. Join the Holland Civic theatre as we discover not only the day-to-day routine of these characters’ jobs, but expose their hopes and aspirations as well.


SCHEDULE | DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE


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