This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
The Importance of


Perhaps nowhere else is the importance of communication as evident as it is in Infertility Treatment. The communication between a patient and the physician is vital, but interface must not stop there. The communication line should remain open to all office staff, including nursing staff, program coordinators, laboratory personnel, and the embryologist, as well as receptionists, appointment secretaries, and people in charge of billing and insurance. Perhaps the most important communication is between you and your spouse or partner. Communication is the essential to maintain a satisfying relationship with your healthcare team.


An appointment with your healthcare provider is a two- way street. Youmust communicate well to explain your medical history and previous treatments youmay have had. Your provider will provide his/her evaluation and treatment recommendations, and appropriate explanations to insure your understanding of the process. Inmany cases, youmay be given information thatmay be completely new to you. Take notes. Be open with your provider, and feel free to ask questions until you feel you have adequately grasped the concepts and information presented. After you leave the office, additional questions or concernsmay arise.


Communication BY GEORGE OKAGAKI AND KAREN HAMMOND, DNP, CRNP


Jot down those points. Feel free to call your physician or nurse for clarification, or take your list of questions to your next office visit. Sometimes visits to your healthcare provider can be a bit intimidating, so having your thoughts on paper can help you to get themost out of each visit. Your success is, in large part, due to your providers understanding of you as an individual, as well as your comprehension to precisely follow through with their instructions.


Nurses play an important role during infertility treatment. Your nurse is often your liaison with the physician. Open communication lines with the your nurse can provide further clarification on your treatment plan, as well as day-to-day questions or concerns thatmay arise. The watchful eyes of the nurses will sometimes spot problems ormake observations thatmay lead to the discovery the need for additional evaluation and treatments. Your nurse can help you understand their treatment protocols and provide you with encouragement and instruction along the way. All of the information gleaned through communication with variousmembers of the healthcare teamcan greatly reduces stress for the patient to be able to build the foundation for a successful treatment.


Youmay have specific cultural or ethnic needs. Communicate that information with your healthcare team. If you perceive a language barrier, bring a translater or friend along for your visits.


THE RESOURCES LISTED IN THIS DIRECTORY ARE UNSCREENED AND SHOULD NOT BE VIEWED AS RECOMMENDATIONS OR ENDORSEMENTS, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, BY THE AFA. 19


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168