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Hygiene rating may become compulsory


“I believe that consistency is essen- tial for this approach to be effective. A mandatory national food hygiene rating scheme will deliver the maxi- mum benefit to consumers and mini- mise the costs to businesses, so this single scheme must be rolled out across all local authorities,” he writes in his report.


The Food Standard Agency (FSA)’s food hygiene scheme should be com- pulsory, argues a recent government report. Lord Young’s ‘Common Sense, Common Safety’ study also calls for the FSA’s Food Hygiene Rating Scheme (FHRS) to be deployed on a national basis.


The FHRS displays ratings on a numeric scale: A rating of five indicates very good food hygiene standards, four means good, three is generally satisfactory, two shows improvement


necessary, one is urgent improvement necessary and a zero rating is urgent improvement necessary. The ratings are voluntarily displayed at hospitality businesses through logos, certificates and stickers, with a publicly-available online database also being tested.


Some local authorities have their own hygiene rating schemes. However Lord Young suggests that one single man- datory initiative would be more effec- tive in tackling poor food hygiene.


If the scheme can harness media and consumer power as expected, then it should not be necessary to insist that businesses display ratings. However, the report recommends that the suc- cess of a voluntary display approach should be reviewed after 12 months, after which point it should be made compulsory if required.


The Government may act quickly on the report’s recommendations. Lord Young believes it is important that the scheme is successfully up and run- ning in readiness for the increased number of tourists that the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games will attract.


Curry Republic aims to start a revolution


The official opening of The Curry Republic in Henley-in-Arden by the town’s High Sheriff, John Rutherford, possibly marks the start of an exciting new chapter for the spice business in the Midlands. The first in a proposed chain of similar outlets across the region, The Curry Republic aims to offers fine Indian cuisine at affordable prices – either delivered or prepared for collection – while in the Henley outlet there is also a seated restaurant area. “We want our brand to become a house- hold name and for customers to know exactly what they can expect – quality food with a consistent taste – wherever they buy it,” comments Bilal Ahmed, chief executive of Bywater Investment


Spice Business Magazine


Group and proprietor of the new venture. Previously family had run a successful curry res- taurant in Birmingham for more than 20 years. To ensure consistency, the menu will be kept at around 40 dishes and there will be online order- ing facilities. Two more outlets are scheduled to open in Shirley and Birmingham city centre in the next few months.


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December 2010


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