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for fitting out warships. The 12 foot high dockyard wall is still more or less complete, except for breaches to allow a railway line and, more recently, a new road to the Irish ferry terminal. Inside the orginal dock gates is a mural depicting the badges of all the regiments which garrisoned the town for a century and a half.


This early postcard show the massive roof constructions covering the building slips in the dockyard.


It was originally intended that the market hall would be within the dockyard wall. When this plan was changed the wall had to be diverted around the market, creating a blind spot which was not covered by the artillery in the two gun towers. Consequently this section of wall was fitted with musketry loopholes which are still visible. Outside the Dockyard, in Fort Road, are the remains of the Admiralty gasworks dating from 1855. The nearby South Pembrokeshire Hospital was built as a Naval Hospital in 1902 and was extended by the RAF in World War II.


Paterchurch Battery (SM 956039): Paterchurch Battery was built by the Admiralty in 1840 - 42 on the western side of Pembroke Dockyard, on the site of a fort built during the Seven Years War. In 1856 the battery was taken over by the ordnance department and renovated from plans prepared by Lieutenant Charles Gordon (1833 - 1885), later General Gordon of Khartoum. This famous military figure was stationed in Pembroke Dock with the Royal Engineers in 1851, and sailed from the town that year for the War in the Crimea.


The battery, which mounted 23 guns, was much used by the Pembroke Dock Artillery Volunteers for practice and drill. This volunteer movement was first started in the town in 1859 and the men wore a grey uniform. In 1860 its name was changed to the 2nd Pembrokeshire Rifle Volunteers, but two years later this name was altered to the Pembroke Dock Volunteer Artillery. The commanding officer was Captain Edgecumbe Chevalier who was eventually succeeded by Captain J Richardson. He held command for some years. The post of surgeon at that time was filled by a Dr Reynolds, and the sergeant majors were W H Lloyd and George Sloggett.


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