This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Some attempts were made to improve the defences of the ancient palace. Doors and windows along its southern facade were blocked up, using a still visible pink mortar. Also to the south, a wall which bounds the grounds and overlooks the old fishpond may date from this period. It bears traces of what is possibly a firing platform for musketeers, as well as a musket-loop.


These preparations were in vain. At some time in the first winter of the war, most likely in January 1643, the palace was raided by a group of royalist soldiers from Carmarthen, led by Captain Crowe. Details of the action are scarce, but they drove off over 700 head of cattle and may have caused some damage to the fabric of the building. Undaunted, Mary Gunter continued to support the garrison of Pembroke Castle, the only other Parliamentary stronghold in west Wales. Between 10th January 1643 and 16th September 1644, she supplied foodstuffs and other goods to the value of £208-10s to the castle garrison.


Barrack huts to the east of Lamphey Palace and encroaching into the Palace Grounds


In 1645, at a time when it appeared that Pembroke might fall to the royalist army of Charles Gerard and she herself was in considerable danger from marauding bands of enemy soldiers, Mrs Gunter never wavered in her efforts to feed her Parliamentary neighbours. A Public Faith Bill to the value of £720-16s-8d was signed by Laugharne, Poyer and five others on 30th April 1645, showing that they


had received further provisions from Lamphey. The Bill could theoretically be redeemed for cash at a later date. The amount specified in the Bill would today be worth over £89,430, but Mrs Gunter was never to recover the full amount of what was owed her, although she did eventually recover a proportion.


British and US huts at Windsor Farm; the RAF huts are among the trees, the later US tents are on the left.


Windsor Farm (SN 018012): This area was the site of a hutted encampment during World War I when the Manchester Regiment was based here. In World War II it became RAF Pembroke Dock Site No. 5, a dispersed camp consisting of 16 huts and a sewage disposal works; the camp later housed American servicemen. The concrete bases of nine barrack huts can also be found amid the undergrowth to the east of Lamphey Palace. The concrete badge of the Manchester Regiment has also survived.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245