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family of Slebech. Eighteen great guns and six fi eld carriages were captured, as well as the two ships sheltering in the pill. T ere are few reminders to be seen today of the action at Pill Fort. T e overgrown ramparts existed until recently on the Gunkle in the modern Vicary Crescent, but were bulldozed fl at in the early 1990s; bungalows were built upon the site. St T omas’ Chapel was restored in the 1930s and can still be seen behind the houses on the Rath.


T e Rath: T e role played by the port of Milford Haven in the preparations for D- Day was recognised in 1994 when a memorial was erected on the Rath. Members of the Pembrokeshire Normandy Veterans Association hold an annual service there on June 6th. Other memorials?


St T omas Beckett Chapel: Just off Pill Lane is St T omas Beckett Chapel which was pressed into service as a magazine for the Napoleonic gun battery sited on the Rath. Of the battery - which stood on the curve of the Rath - no trace now remains.


Castle Pill: At the bottom of Slip Hill in Castle Pill are concrete barges which were used as supply barges during the D-Day landings. Pill Point was the site of a balloon station during WW1. T os. Ward’s ship-breaking yard was located here between 1934 and 1956.


Marble Hall Road: A brick structure at the N E edge of the football fi eld was an ARP Warden’s post during WW2. T e British Beryllium Factory off Marble Hall Road was a wartime factory, built to process locally grown fl ax as Britain strove to create its own fl ax industry as foreign supplies dried up.


Liddeston: On a junction on the road leading to the hamlet of Liddeston is a much over- grown brick structure which was a WW2 Home Guard post. Below Liddeston, on the west side of Priory Pill, are the remains of a tank farm once used as an Air Ministry fuel depot and built as part of the 1930s expansion in British military infrastructure which also saw the opening of the Mine Depot at Newton Noyes. T e former administration block for the fuel depot is the white building which can be seen set into the bank above Tesco stores.


St Botolph’s (SM890 078): Visible from the road near Liddeston, this former manor house was used by the Army as its gunnery operations HQ during WW2. All the anti-aircraft defences for Milford Haven were controlled from the operations room in the mansion.


Steynton (SM917 077): Steynton Church tower was used as a musketry position during the Civil War action at Pill Fort. T ornton cemetery has a large section devoted to war graves.


Newton Noyes (SM918 050): T e Royal Navy established a depot here in the 1930s for the manufacture and storage of mines. T e mines were stored in large underground magazines and moved around by the depot’s own railway system. T is rail system combined standard and narrow gauge and extended onto a jetty where the mines would be loaded onto ships. Housing for the naval offi cers was located near the former mansion of Castle Hall. T e remains of two WW2 mine-watching posts can be found between T e Horseshoe and the Gulf refi nery jetty.


Further reading: An Experience Shared by Vernon Scott.


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