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MILFORD HAVEN (SM905058)


Milford Haven was planned as a new town in the early 19th century between the earlier settlements of Hakin and Pill. A dockyard built ships for the Admiralty, and there was a regular boat service to Ireland. T is early promise faded when the dockyard was moved to Pembroke Dock. T e arrival of the railway in 1863 gave the town new impetus, and a large docks complex was built. T is became home to the sixth largest fi shing fl eet in Britain and the town prospered and grew. T e port was heavily involved in the build- up to D-Day in the spring of 1944. Nearly 1,000 American naval personnel manned the town’s USN advanced amphibious base which included a hospital built in Hakin and a docks complex at Newton Noyes. T e base had a complement of 71 offi cers and 902 enlisted men. T e decline of the fi shing industry in the 1950s was off set by the growth in the oil industry, with several refi neries being built along the Haven.


Esso Jetty to Hakin Point: In Conduit Bay/ Little Wick, below the former Esso Refi nery can be seen the remains of a slipway and a rail-track leading to a boathouse. T is is where provisions etc. were landed for nearby South Hook Fort (see Herbrandston). Also stored here were the fl oating targets used for practice by the gunners at the fort. Between the Esso and Amoco jetties, a concrete pillar on the seaward side of the coast path is a ‘DRF’ - a depression range fi nder used to calibrate the 19th century gunnery defences. Inland from Hubberston Fort (see below), the housing estate of Hakin stands where an American military hospital was set up in preparation for D-Day. At Hakin Point (SM899 054) is a concrete jetty built by an American amphibious support unit during WW2 to support tank landing craft based at Milford Docks.


Hubberston Fort: (SM 890 055): Hubberston Fort was built between 1860 and 1865, and housed about 250 men in D-shaped, bomb-proof barracks which were defended at the landward side by a ditch protected by a counter-scarp gallery. T e casemated battery was situated further down the headland and originally comprised 28 guns. In the 1870s, eight of the guns on top of the casemates were removed and replaced by Moncrieff guns. T ese guns were set on carriages and operated on a counterweight system so that they remained hidden in special concrete pits until the time came to fi re them, when they would be hoisted into position; although partially infi lled with concrete for a 12-pdr QF practice battery these concrete pits are still visible. T e casemates were bricked up early


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