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MARLOES & ST BRIDE’S (SM79085)


Once a village of lobster fi shermen, Marloes still has close links with the sea and with the Pembrokeshire islands; boats for Skomer and Skokholm leave from nearby Martin’s Haven. Marloes Sands, a mile from the village, is noted for the remains of the Albion paddle steamer which sank in 1840. In the churchyard at St Bride’s are buried several members of the Kensington family of nearby St Bride’s Castle. T e family also owned several of the off shore islands, as well as much of Marloes village itself where the clock tower was built in 1904 in memory of the fourth Baron Kensington.


St Bride’s Castle (SM795 106): T e imposing mansion overlooking St Bride’s Bay was built in the early part of the 18th century by William Philipps who had married Albania Laugharne, the sister and heiress of John Laugharne. T e Laugharnes were a well- known local gentry family whose earlier members had included Major General Rowland Laugharne, the commander who had successfully upheld the Parliamentary cause in west Wales during the First Civil War. Fragments of the earlier manor house occupied by Rowland and his ancestors can still be found near the church. T e new mansion built by William Phillips was known as St Bride’s Hill.


In 1880 the fourth Baron Kensington


bought the estate, but it was sold by the sixth Baron in 1920. T e house became a hospital, though it has since been divided into holiday apartments.


Philbeach Lane: A fi eld to the south of this lane was the site of a World War Two anti- aircraft battery and searchlight emplacement.


Just after Tree Hill Farm can be seen a


rocky outcrop to the north. T e derelict brick structure on this outcrop is all that remains of the control room which operated the WW2 bombing decoy on Marloes Mere.


Marloes Sands to Deer Park: T e coast path leading north from Marloes Sands passes a


World War Two anti-aircraft searchlight emplacement at Gateholm Stack (SM772 075). On a hill on the promontory of Deer Park are the remains of a coastguard look-out built in the 1930s following the Molesey disaster in Jack Sound in 1929. Used as a coast-watching post during WW2, it reverted to its original purpose after the war and continued to be used as a coastguard look-out until the late 1970s.


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