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Fishguard Harbour: A memorial in the departure hall at Fishguard Harbour ferry terminal recalls those who died during WW2 following attacks on the Irish ferries St Patrick, St Andrew and St David. T e St Patrick was sunk off Strumble Head in June 1941 with the loss of 30 lives. T e St Andrew and St David were both requisitioned as hospital ships and both were bombed in the Anzio beach head area in January 1944 - the St David being sunk. Goodwick Beach: T e beach was the scene of the formal surrender of the French forces which landed near here in 1797. A plaque records the event.


Fishguard Town: Behind the town’s primary school and Catholic school can be seen four examples of WW2 fi fty-person air-raid shelters. T ese had reinforced, blast-proof walls with the entrance protected by a blast-wall. One of the shelters behind the Catholic School is used as a games store for the school. In the back yard of the Town Hall are the remains of a brick structure - a WW2 gas de-contamination unit. T e St John Ambulance Brigade store at Bank House was originally a WW2 First Aid and Rescue post.


Marine Walk: A number of WW2 searchlight batteries were located along the coast here. At Penyraber the Old Drill Hall was used by an artillery unit in the early 20th century; it had two guns which could be used to defend the harbour. In the Jubilee Walk garden are displayed two guns - a German fi eldpiece dating to the First World War and a British Millar’s-pattern howitzer dating from Napoleonic times.


Fishguard Fort from the South West


Royal Oak, Fishguard Square: A room at this inn was used as the headquarters of the defence force rapidly put together to meet the threat of the French invasion of 1797. T e inn contains several reminders of the episode.


Fishguard Fort: Fishguard Fort occupies a natural defensive site on a promontory overlooking Lower Town harbour.


It was built in about 1780 in response to the threat


posed by privateer raiders and in particular the activities of Paul Jones and Stephen Manhant. Built at the expense of the Lord Lieutenant, Sir Hugh Owen, the fort was supplied with guns by the Board of Ordnance which also provided gunnery training for local volunteers; however the local townspeople were expected to pay for powder and shot. T e fort was armed with eight nine-pounder guns, which may have stood on the raised platform behind the building. At the time of the abortive French invasion of 1797 the fort was being manned by three Royal Artillery invalids, but whether the guns were ever fi red in anger remains open to debate. During the Second World War two Lewis Gun emplacements were located within the ramparts of the fort, together with a searchlight battery. Alongside the path leading down to the fort can be seen the concrete footings of the hut which once provided accommodation for the searchlight operators.


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