This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
was remodelled in 1901 to accommodate a new battery which included four fi ve-inch BL guns mounted on Vavasseur carriages in the barbette battery and two 3lb QF guns on the roof. A short time later, between 1904-05, gun emplacements were built on the cliff top above the old fort; these were equipped with two 9.2-inch BL Mark X guns and three 6-inch Mark VII guns; these gun emplacements can be seen behind the fort. In the First World War West Blockhouse was manned by the Royal Artillery, and it was brought into service again in the Second World War when it was again garrisoned by the Royal Artillery and was the ‘Examination Battery’ responsible for ensuring ships neither entered nor left the port without authority. Beyond the fort, in Watwick Bay, is the small quay where all the fort’s supplies would have been landed. West Blockhouse has been restored by the Landmark Trust and visitors are able to stay there.


July 1946 T e Gann, Dale


Watwick (SM816 040): Near the path to Watwick Bay can be seen the concrete footings which are all that remain of a WW2 gun battery dedicated to the defence of the Haven against mine-laying aircraft. A concrete block with a metal pillar embedded in it was one of the anchors of the WW2 boom defence. Watwick Point was the site of a ‘dummy’ anti-aircraft battery, complete with telegraph poles painted to look like guns.


Dale Fort (SM825 052): Dale Point was fortifi ed in Napoleonic times, with a battery of cannons protected by an earth bank. T e present fort was built in the 1850s as part of the defences of Milford Haven, and its garrison of 60 had charge of one 80lb Millar’s Pattern shell gun, seven 68lb guns plus two 32lb guns for landward defences. Together with West Blockhouse and T orn Island forts, Dale Fort was one of the last built in Great Britain to counter wooden-walled, sail-driven warships and by 1871 it was considered obsolete. T e fort was reoccupied in 1892 and was altered to allow the installation of a Zalinski dynamite gun, a new pneumatic coastal defence weapon which could fi re a 15” shell weighing 966lb over 4,500 yards using compressed air.


A paddle-steamer


called the Harpy was used as a target and the trials proved to be highly successful, but in the meantime a bore-safe high explosive called Lyddite had been invented, rendering the elaborate compressed air system unneccesary. Subsequent to the dismantling of the dynamite gun the fort remained in military hands until it was decommissioned in 1902 and became a private house. It was used as a signal station in the First World War, and was also one end of the Haven’s boom defence (the other end was at T orn Island). T e fort was again pressed into service in WW2 when it was used as a Degaussing Range to measure the magnetic signatures of ships to ensure they were not capable of setting off magnetic mines laid by the Luftwaff e. If the signature was too great the ships would be ordered into Milford Docks to be ‘degaussed’. T e fort is now a Field Studies Centre and public access is limited.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245