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for 1,000 men. T e camp was used for training purposes in the early part of the war, and to give troops some much-needed rest and recuperation in the later stages of the confl ict.


RAF Kete (SM 802 040): RAF Kete (AMES 69A) was established early in the Second World War as a Chain Home Low (CHL) radar station for the tracking of low-fl ying aircraft; it was never an airfi eld. It was later absorbed into HMS Harrier (SM 801 045) a Royal Navy Fighter Direction School and also a School of Meteorology. It closed in 1960 and a few earth banks are all that now remain. Near Kete, on the west side of the road to St Ann’s Head is a Cold War structure, a Royal Observer Corps nuclear monitoring post. Further along the road, on the opposite side, can be seen the brick huts which housed the staff of the wartime RAF Chain Home Low radar post.


Brunt Farm (SM809 040): Brunt Farm was the site of a heavy anti-aircraft battery during WW2. However that didn’t prevent the farm suff ering considerable damage when a misdirected parachute mine landed close by in 1941.


St Ann’s Head (SM 802 040): Lighthouses have existed at St Ann’s Head since 1713. T e present structures, the old high light and the low light were built respectively in 1800 and 1844. Just before WW2, the redundant high lighthouse of 1800 was crowned with a concrete observation box to become the Milford Haven Fire Command Headquarters. T e site also acted as the Royal Navy’s Port War Signal Station (PWSS), identifying any warships approaching the entrance to the Haven. During the First World War the site had functioned in a similar role, but the observation post used at that time has been demolished. However traces of the First World War do remain in the form of rifl e loopholes cut into the boundary wall that divides the Trinity House land from the rest of the peninsula. During the Second World War the approach to the wall from the north was further protected by barbed wire entanglements and a minefi eld running the width of the headland.


St. Ann’s Head, PF Cell and former Fire Command Post


Mill Bay (SM 808 033): Above Mill Bay can be seen what looks like a pill box. T is is actually a battery observation post dating from about 1905. Alongside the path down to the bay is a concrete cubicle which was once a telephone test hut through which ran the armoured cables from the command post at St Ann’s Head to the various gun batteries.


West Blockhouse (SM 816 035): T e original West Blockhouse was a fortifi ed tower dating from about 1580. T e present West Blockhouse was built in the 1850s to guard the entrance to the Haven. Solidly constructed out of limestone and granite, the fort had accommodation for 41 men and one offi cer and a battery of six 68-pounder cannons. It


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