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the range was used by Fleet Air Arm helicopters, who used a variety of circuits within the range boundary. Te range is still used occasionally today.


To the east of the car park at St Govan’s are the remains of a large bombing circle. It was originally intended that this large bulls-eye shaped target, with its distinctive arrow indicating the correct line of attack, was to be used for ‘dry’ attacks, the accuracy of which could be measured using special cameras, but it would seem that is was also used for “live” firing, probably with cannons. Te target comprises concentric circles marked out in limestone rubble. Te attack line arrow runs through the centre of the target. Tere is little damage to the target, save that caused when a tank hulk was dragged away from the centre of the bulls-eye when this part of the bombing range ceased being used.


Walking west from the car park at St Govan’s, passing the concrete filled Saladin armoured car in the target area for the helicopter range, the modern radar site at Te Castle can be seen, near the ramparts of an Iron Age fort. Tis, alongside an ancillary site at Saddle Head, provides Range Safety coverage for the area and is linked by microwave relay to the main range control tower at Warren.


Near Huntsman’s Leap (SR 961929) is an unusual post-war construction comprising a pair of parallel triangular brick walls, nine feet tall, set on a concrete plinth. Te purpose of this structure is unknown, although it had electric power and must have been a mounting for equipment of some kind.


Roads: Most of the tanks travelling to and from the AFV range at Castlemartin during the war years drove under their own power from Pembroke railway station to the camp at. Merrion. Tis caused huge damage to the roads, particularly where tanks had to slew around corners. While the range was closed for major reconstruction in the spring of 1943, it was decided to reinforce many of the corners along the route with concrete. Much of this reinforcement has been hidden beneath subsequent layers of tar macadam, but some slabs are still visible at the crossroads near Sampson Farm. Other stretches of reinforced concrete roadway and hardstandings can be seen at various sites, including Trenorgan, Carew Farm and Newton. Tis work was carried out by Hussey Egan and Pickmere.


Saddle Point (SR 982940): On the headland overlooking Broadhaven are several rock-cut weapons pits and also a rectangular rock-cut platform, all dating from about 1942. Teir precise function is uncertain, since they may have been an anti-invasion emplacements or they may have been a training feature in association with the nearby tank range.


Stackpole Warren and Barafundle (SR 990950): During the Second World War, Stackpole Warren was used as a field firing area for troops stationed at Pembroke Dock and other camps in South Pembrokeshire; some earthworks used in target practice can still be seen. For a while in 1943 the Warren was used by Armoured Engineer units developing techniques for use on the upcoming invasion of Europe. It is believed that the area was also used during the First World War as a training area. Tere is now


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