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Castlemartin (SR 915 983): Castlemartin Pound, in the centre of the village, was fi tted out with ‘pill-boxes’ during WW2 and used as a machine gun emplacement. On the medieval castle mound at Castle Farm (privately owned) are the remains of a WW2 Royal Observer Corps post. Near Castlemartin is Brownslade House, the former mansion home of the Lambton family. When the army arrived in 1939 it became the Offi cers’ Mess but was abandoned in 1942 as being too close to the fi ring range. T e house fell into disrepair and was blown up in 1973. In Castlemartin Church is a small stone tablet in memory of Stoker Petty Offi cer Richard Morris of Coxey, Castlemartin, who gave his life while serving on HMS Charybdis on October 23, 1943.


Castlemartin Camp (SR 915 983): T is site can trace its origins back to the late 1930s when plans were being made to expand the British Army and it became a Royal Armoured Corps (RAC) camp and tank range. At the end of the Second World War the range was returned to agriculture, but as the Cold War started to escalate in 1948 the land was requisitioned and has remained in military hands ever since. A public car park is situated immediately outside the main gate of the camp to permit access to view the two ‘Gate Guardian’ tanks - a Centurion Mk 12 main battle tank and a heavy-gun Conqueror tank, both dating from the Cold War. Inside the gates, not open to the public, are two further tanks, a Churchill Crocodile fl ame-throwing tank used by the 79th Armoured Division and a 1980s German Leopard Mk 2 tank.


Hard Target, Cheiftain (A1) Linney Head Blockhouse Winch, Linney Head


Flimston (SR 924 955): Flimston Chapel stands in isolated splendour at the heart of the military range. Dating from the fi fth century, it was restored in 1903 by the Lambton family of Brownslade as a memorial to their sons who were killed in the Boer War.


In


1970 it was further restored by offi cers, soldiers and civilian staff


from the


range. A small military/ civilian airfi eld was established south of the chapel in 1937/1938, used by the RAF and Western Airlines - a civilian contractor. T e airfi eld comprised an airstrip, three canvas Bessonneaux hangars and various temporary buildings, none of which are now visible.


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