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A number of plaques can be found on the walls of the church remembering servicemen who were killed during the First World War. On entering the churchyard a slate Commonwealth War Graves headstone can be seen to the left of the path. Tis is the last resting place of Pte Osborne Griffiths who died on November 16th, 1915 of wounds received in action at Loos, France on September 30. His family named Osborne House in the village of Milton in remembrance of him,


Carew New Churchyard (SN 045030): Situated on the left-hand side of the road leading to the village of Carew Cheriton, the new cemetery is approximately 200 metres from the exit off the roundabout on the A477. Te war graves plot is situated in the southern corner of the cemetery and contains fifteen burials from the Second World War.


With the graves relating to airmen of six different nationalities, this is a very interesting cemetery to visit. Besides three British aircrew, four crewmembers from a Hudson aircraft of the Royal Netherlands Naval Air Service are buried alongside three members of a Canadian Lancaster crew and two Polish pilots who served with the target towing flight.


Sgt Francis McCaffry, a New Zealander, served at Carew Cheriton with 236 Coastal Command squadron and lost his life whilst landing his Blenheim aircraft in the darkness of an October night. A Spitfire pilot who served at Angle is also buried at Carew; why this should be is not known when you take into account that there are war graves to found in Angle churchyard. Flt/Sgt Morris Ezra Shaw was an American from Utah who joined the Canadian Air Force. Te inscription on his headstone reads: ‘Who died for his mother’s country’. Families regularly return from Canada, New Zealand, Te Netherlands and America to visit war graves at Carew Cheriton.


Carew Parish War Memorial (SN 047037): Situated to the left of the A4075 as you enter the village of Carew from the south, the memorial sits on the junction with the Mill Lane and the magnificent castle acts as a backdrop. Te memorial lists the names of eleven men from the First World War and twelve from the Second World War who gave their lives in the two conflicts. A service is held round the memorial on Remembrance Sundays and is well attended by the parishioners.


Te marble obelisk constructed in three sections was erected by T Picton from Milton and supplied by T W Colley from Pembroke. Te memorial was unveiled on Sunday September 1st, 1929 by Col F D Trollope Bellew DSO, MC and dedicated by the vicar of Carew, the Rev W G Spurrell. Te land of which the memorial stands was donated to the parish by Te Hon Mrs Trollope Bellew of Crowcombe, owner of the Carew Estate.


Milton House (SN 039029): Known today as Milton Manor, the house is situated to the south of the A477 at the western end of Milton village. Locally called ‘Milton Back’, this imposing building featured in both world wars.


During the active life of the Royal Naval Air Station between 1915 and 1920 the fifty women (WRNS and WRAF) attached to the station had their quarters at Milton House. At the time of WW2 the property was owned by Lt/Col Corlis St Ledger Gillman Hawkes CMG, DSO, RFA who himself had a distinguished service career. His son, Pilot Officer Corlis St Ledger Hawkes was killed in 1942 in Egypt while serving with 267 Squadron an was laid to rest in Heliopolis war cemetery, Egypt.


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