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(SN 056024); incendiary store (SN 055025); flame float store (SN 054024) and a transformer plinth.


Crickchurch/ Cardeeth (SN 056037): Between Crickchurch and Cardeeth are several structures built in connection with the airfield and which survive in reasonable condition. Near Cardeeth is a semi-sunken, brick-walled pill- box notable for its internal ‘anti- ricochet’ wall (SN 056037) while nearby is a gun post/ weapons pit set into a hedge. Closer to Crickchurch is another semi-sunken hexagonal pill-box with an anti-aircraft machine gun emplacement alongside (SN 055035). Nearby is a small concrete revetted trench with concrete overhead cover. Tis offered a field of fire to the south and like many of the defences in the area was not designed to protect the airfield from attack, but instead was designed to make life uncomfortable for enemy forces in the event of the airfield being captured.


Semi-sunken pill-box on the eastern perimeter of the airfield.


Sageston Hall (SN 057034): Te remains of a Home Guard post and store stand at the junction with the Tenby road, together with a recently-excavated spigot mortar post covering the road junction.


Home Guard Auxiliary: Te so-called ‘Secret Army’ was very active in the Carew area and there are known to have been hides at Welston and Carew Mountain. According to local legend, the Carew Home Guard Auxiliary once took part in an exercise involving a ‘raid’ on a locally-based unit of Canadian troops. Te night before the raid was due to take place, the Carew unit invited the Canadians to a local pub for a few drinks. While they were making merry, a couple of other members of the local Auxiliary slipped into the Canadian camp and made off with most of their combat gear. Te following morning, the hung-over and under-equipped Canadians were no match for the Carew raiding party!


St Mary’s Church, Carew Cheriton (SN045028): A wide period of military history is on display in the parish church situated in the small village of Carew Cheriton. In 1857 the great west window was installed as a memorial to those who had fallen in the Crimean War. At the opposite end of the church the wonderful stained glass window above the altar was damaged during bombing raids on the nearby airfield. It was restored after the war and a brass plaque situated by the altar reads: ‘Tis window was restored by the airmen and airwomen of RAF Carew Cheriton, December 1945’.


Two reading desks were given by the families in memory of Pilot Officer George Phelps and Flight Lieutenant Corlis St Ledger Hawkes who lost their lives while with the RAF. To the right of the altar rail a brass plaque records the names of the naval airmen who lost their lives while serving at RNAS Milton.


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