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Home Ideas | Windows & Doors


Doors Although undoubtedly windows are a massive part of the “wow” factor in the refurbishment of period properties, doors can also make or break the true feel of a correctly renovated home. People often see


doors as unsightly, old or cold and diffi cult to operate. Often in the hands of an expert they can be transformed back into the beautiful original door, again with the added benefi ts of modern draught proofi ng. If the original door is missing, as


before, looking at nearby properties can provide the answer to the correct design. External doors should always be made from hardwood because modern softwood increasingly comes with a high moisture content and, if in direct sunlight or subject to extreme weather conditions, shrinkage and warping can destroy your beautiful new door. If you have a lovely old door but it does


not fi t as well as it once did, re-hanging and draught proofi ng can be an excellent solution. Specialist companies such as Brookdown Joinery can copy old doors


ABOVE LEFT: JELD-WEN, one of the UK’s leading manufacturers of timber fi re doors, has seen a rise in the number of fi re doors being used to replace standard internal doors, as homeowners become more aware of fi re risks in the home.


ABOVE: Sandtex provides masonry and gloss paint for the exterior of your home. Available from leading DIY outlets. (Shown in Pillar Box Red).


LEFT: Loire exterior French doors (1190 x 2074mm) from Wicks.


RIGHT: This Contemporary four pane internal door is available from e-Joinery.


94 Traditional Homes & Interiors | December 2010 – January 2011 www.thimagazine.com


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