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Windows & Doors | Home Ideas


LEFT: A typical sliding sash timber window from Mumford & Wood’s ConservationTM range is factory fi nished with high performance double glazed panels. Single glazed options are available in sensitive period renovations.


BELOW LEFT: Interior shot of sash window furnished with sash lifts, fi tch catch and D-shaped handles from The Sash Window Workshop.


RIGHT: French doorsets in Mumford & Wood’s ConservationTM range can be dressed with fi xed or open panels to each side, and with windows above to add dramatic height to the opening.


Now let’s look in closer detail at the options...


Window Refurbishment People often look at their windows and come to the conclusion that they are in desperate need of renewal, but more often than not the issues can be resolved and restoring the existing windows can be relatively simple, which can allow the home to retain its original beauty. People can also be unaware that casement windows can usually be draught proofed as well as box frame sash windows. Quality companies will visit your home


to talk through the real condition of your windows and give realistic solutions to the problems. Draught proofi ng and the refurbishment of existing windows is one


option for those who want to retain the look and feel of the original windows. However, this may only be a short term solution especially if the wood is rotting, in which case it might pay to have the window replaced. Seek advice from specialist companies who can advise you. When done correctly the work involves


a highly skilled tradesman working at your home. He will remove the staff and parting beads, and depending on the condition of the windows and the customer’s preference, will either re-use or renew these items. He will remove the opening sashes, and whilst these are out of the box fame, he will


LEFT: Mumford & Wood’s manufacturing fl exibility allows any combination of paned and non-bar glazing options while still achieving traditional sightlines.


ABOVE RIGHT: The Shutter Shop supplies interior painted tier on tier adjustable louvre shutters from £150.00 per square metre.


RIGHT: This shows a curved casement bay window replaced with all new double glazed replica windows designed to blend with the character of this period home. Sashy and Sashy Ltd.


www.thimagazine.com December 2010 – January 2011 | Traditional Homes & Interiors 91


remove the pulley wheels, rub down the box frame checking for any defects. The most common problem with the box frame can be the sills and quite often at least the sill font will be in need of replacement. Additionally, sometimes the external face boards or jambs can have rotten timber. These items can usually have the rotten timber removed and replicas skilfully pieced back into the frame. The frame is also rubbed down to remove any heavy built up areas of old paint. It is also important to remember, that with any windows on the fi rst fl oor, you will need to factor in scaffolding to comply with Health and Safety Regulations. The sashes are inspected, they may need the joints re-cramping or complete


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