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Home Ideas | Windows & Doors


Period features, whether original or replicated can turn even a small terraced property from a drab looking house into the best home in the neighbourhood.


ABOVE: First impressions count, these double glazed windows are available from Westbury Windows and Doors.


BELOW: Interior shot of 3-paned French doors from The Sash Window Workshop.


Count S


ometimes the original features are still in place, but can be tired, ill fi tting or poorly decorated. If this


is the case, then specialist companies can refurbish the original windows and add modern developments, for example effective draught proofi ng, to make the windows even better than new. From time to time, only part of the


features remain in place, but again specialist companies can refurbish what is left and add replica replacements as needed to return the windows to their former glory. On occasions the windows are


beyond repair and complete renewals are needed, but again replica versions can be manufactured to retain the original look. In copying the design of a window, modern improvements can be incorporated to also improve heat effi ciency, for instance, by adding double-glazing. All three options are actually excellent


ways of saving money, as they all offer various elements of heat effi ciency, whilst giving the added bonus of “doing your bit”


90 Traditional Homes & Interiors | December 2010 – January 2011 www.thimagazine.com First Impressions


for the environment. Additionally, your home will look more beautiful and be so much more of a pleasure to live in – and as the housing market picks up, it will also undoubtedly add value to your home.


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