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Home Entertainment | Home Ideas


RIGHT: A comprehensive high-end home automation system that fi ts seamlessly into its rural farmhouse environment.


BELOW RIGHT: AWE exclusivity distributes the world’s fi rst cinema proportion 3D TV, the 58” Philips Platinum Series 21:9 LED screen.


BELOW: By showcasing its LED range of TVs in the UK, LG is introducing consumers to a world of Seamless Entertainment. Along with its LED technology, the stylish SL9000 has fi ve distinct energy saving modes and has a 40 per cent power consumption saving when compared to similar-sized LCD TVs.


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homeowners with the desire for a more traditional fi nish. A comprehensive range of lift mechanisms for fl at screen TVs catering for screens of all sizes are available through Future Automation (www. futureautomation.co.uk). Sound systems can also be hidden out of sight, with speakers hidden in walls or ceiling. You no longer have to compromise beautiful interiors to enjoy music and movies. The choice of screens can be daunting,


LCD or Plasma, HD-ready versus Full HD – add 3D into the mix and it’s fair to say that TV buying has been propelled into another dimension. The specialist view is that plasma has always had an undeniably better picture quality than LCD but the issue that arises is one of cost; plasmas are normally more expensive than LCDs. It’s true that LCDs look great in full


High Defi nition but it is important to remember that the amount of standard resolution content being broadcast still exceeds 1080 broadcasts by a considerable amount. For those of you thinking of buying an HD-ready screen, it’s also worth


remembering that HD ready only goes to 720P resolution. All screens under 32 inch are only HD-ready on the basis that the screens are too small to notice much improvement when using full 1080 signals. For a main screen, nothing beats the full HD experience. The recent string of 3D successes at


the box offi ce has whetted the consumer appetite for 3D viewing, increasing the demand for 3D TV in the home by consumers. As a result, there are ways in which 3D can be bought to the home. However, as 3D is still a relatively young technology, achieving the same cinematic experience can come with complications. With advances in 3D from the likes of Sony 3D TV, Sky 3D and 3D Blu-ray; 3D may well be coming to a TV near you, very soon. Choosing what size of TV to buy can


prove to be a diffi cult decision. Consider what space the TV is going to be in; what is the size of the room and what would be its position. If the screen is too large and you are sitting too close, then the human eye will pick out the pixels in the screen, affecting the viewing experience. If the size of the screen is marginal, and there is


a surround sound system installed, go for a larger screen, a small picture and big sound is pretty disappointing. Likewise, a large screen paired with standard speakers can be equally disappointing. Balancing the senses will give the best result.


Location, Location… Choosing the position of where your screen sits in a room is as important as the selection of a screen itself. A preferred position, as highlighted by CEDIA installers is to wall mount screens, as they take up less space than if mounted on a stand. Cables and power sockets can then be hidden away out of sight by being arranged behind the screen to avoid unsightly cables hanging down. Mounting TVs on wall brackets allows the screen to be swung to the correct viewing angle, when required, and tucked away when not in use are very popular. There are many clever solutions such as these that allow home electronics to be integrated seamlessly into your home. All CEDIA installers can advise you on the solution which is best suited to meet your needs.


www.thimagazine.com December 2010 – January 2011 | Traditional Homes & Interiors 81


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