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Home Ideas | Traditionally Chesterfi eld


LEFT: This traditional plain Burnley Chesterfi eld accompanied with a matching wing chair shown in Antique Olive is available from Springvale Leather priced from £600.00.


BELOW LEFT: The Kendal club chair from Distinctive Chesterfi elds.


BELOW: Available from Distinctive Chesterfi elds, the Kent sofa in brown leather.


RIGHT: Suffolk club chair from Distinctive Chesterfi elds.


FAR RIGHT: The Queen Anne wing chair from Distinctive Chesterfi elds.


BELOW RIGHT: This Knightsbridge sofa is available from Saxon Leather.


The Finest Single Hide Leather Chosen by a professional leatherworker for consistent density and colour, an authentic Chesterfi eld uses the highest grade single hide leather that is applied by hand and prevents the need for stitching unlike low grade imitations. A poor quality demic leather replication sofa uses several leather hides that will have varying densities and colours, and are stitched together to appear as one piece. This means there is extensive stitching on the back, sides and seats of the sofa that can be easily pulled apart by wear. You can identify an inferior demic leather sofa by running your fi ngers down the pleats for hidden stitching, which may also be hidden by buttoning, particularly on the outside edge of the arm rests. An authentic Chesterfi eld can take up to three days to fully upholster, depending on the complexity of the design.


Natural Leather Characteristics As an original Chesterfi eld is beautifully hand upholstered in the fi nest grain full hide leather, it will take on its individual characteristics as the leather ages. Real leather is a natural product that will always bear its original marks that create each individual Chesterfi eld appearance that cannot be achieved using poor quality leather. A high quality Chesterfi eld will only increase in beauty with the passing of time and will develop its own unique patina.


Traditional Pleating Detail An authentic Chesterfi eld will be fi nished with beautiful pleated detailing that should be of a good size of two to three inches or greater, allowing the sofa to retain its traditional pleated look when being used. An imitation Chesterfi eld will have smaller


pleats of poor quality leather to save production costs that will come out of place and create an unsightly uneven surface when sat on. The depth of the pleats can be checked by looking for a ridge on the outside and running your fi ngers along the inside of the fold.


Individually Hand Applied Studs The studding fi nishing touch to an original Chesterfi eld gives it its individual style, which can be as subdued or elaborate as you desire. An authentic Chesterfi eld is conscientiously hand fi nished using traditional methods to ensure a precise and high quality fi nish. Using individual studs on each piece, many original Chesterfi elds are fi nished with approximately 300 to 1200 individually hand applied studs. These studs often come in a variety of


74 Traditional Homes & Interiors | December 2010 – January 2011


www.thimagazine.com


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