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Homes In View | Let the Adventure Begin continued from page 52


garden, framed by the fl owing drapes either side of the French windows, also helps the room feel larger. Further down the corridor is the garden room.


Built to Kay’s specifi cation, it replaced a passageway which gave access to the back door, a range of cupboards and water closet. Although it cost a great deal, they were keen to replace the original fl at roof with a pitched one and used slate so that it matched the main building. Kay chose plain windows with an arched design, but incorporated this within the glazing so they’re still easy to clean. The wicker furniture compliments the dark wooden shelves and on the old chest beneath the window, sits a box fi lled with richly coloured pieces of dried fruit. When the sun is high in the sky it fl oods the


whole room and casts a lovely glow, making it a great place to relax and admire the delights of the garden. Years ago the whole area was a quarry, hence the name Rock Terrace and the fact that the garden is sunken with steps leading up to a small lane at the back. A careful choice of plants, plus a bird table and bird bath ensure that robins, wrens and dunnocks are frequent visitors, much to Neil’s delight. Kay and Neil have created several terraces and


built the retaining garden walls themselves. They added the wrought iron railings beside the steps later and these match those outside the front of the property. Although the latter were removed during the war, Kay had them replaced by a local craftsman, now called Richard Railings because they can’t remember his surname! Several other households in the terrace have followed suit. Up one fl ight of stairs is the bathroom - a fairly


recent addition in the house’s long history, because it was without one when they arrived. The occupants had relied on a Belfast sink in the kitchen and an old copper in the basement. An enamel roll-top bath holds centre stage, its golden exterior complimented by the paint on the walls. Up more stairs are the three bedrooms, all decorated to a high standard. However, it’s the back bedroom which appeals because Kay has created a window-seat with a gingham cushion - a lovely place for guests to sit and read the newspaper on a Sunday morning The house has hidden depths, with a dining room


in the basement. Painted an intense shade of red, it seems overwhelming at fi rst, but when lit discretely, the whole room has a lovely intimacy which is ideal when dining with close friends. Kay’s used fabrics from Fired Earth to continue the warm theme. Although the original coving and ceiling roses could still be found in the lounge, Kay had to re-create these here. A picture of Lincoln Cathedral, the original of which hangs in the Usher Gallery hangs above the fi replace. Also on this fl oor is a downstairs loo and most


importantly the kitchen. Put in nine years ago, the kitchen has a great deal of rustic charm with a terracotta tiled fl oor, cream units, wooden work- surfaces, white enamel sink, scrubbed pine table and cottagey accessories. Kay did all the tiling herself! At the centre is a large range where she enjoys


In the bathroom an enamel roll-top bath holds centre stage, its golden exterior complimented by the paint on the walls.


cooking. A shelf added above this gives a period feel and is home to three pretty blue dishes which they inherited from Neil’s mother. Despite this addition, Kay still felt there was something lacking and added the beading to the surrounding pillars. The warming pan on the wall was found on the allotments and polished to its present shine. Although the high ceilings and the eclectic mix


of furniture create a wonderful atmosphere, it’s the fi nishing touches which really make a difference. Everyone can learn from Kay’s design ideas. Hanging linen bags of potpourri from door handles and adding tassels to cheap cushions are all stylish fi nishing touches which don’t cost a great deal. Similarly, a primula fl owering in a container, may be cheap, but it looks effective and last several weeks. Kay and Neil have become friends with all their


neighbours and celebrated the fi ftieth anniversary of the Queen’s coronation with Pimms at number 8 and a barbecue in their garden. They even commissioned a Rock Terrace mug made for the occasion! It seems everyone in the street is keen to enjoy historical occasions as much as they enjoy their homes. In his research Neil found details of an auction


where the properties belonging to a Mrs Egan Newcomb were divided into around 50 lots. Lot 28 referred to ‘all that row of stone-built and slate houses, 1-10 Rock Terrace’. At the time our home was being lived in by a Mr L G Sanders who paid a monthly rent of only nineteen pounds, ten shillings and sixpence. How times change!


54 Traditional Homes & Interiors | December 2010 – January 2011 www.thimagazine.com


ABOVE: Kay knows that the right accessories make all the difference.


RIGHT: A free-standing bath adds a glamorous feel.


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