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Quintessentially English | Homes In View


A great collector, Mary uses one of the spare bedrooms as somewhere to store her possessions. She has accumulated a wide range of ‘treasures’ while living in England and insists they will all return with her to America.


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and around the Aga, providing a high mantelshelf on which Mary can display her porcelain. The warm rust-coloured walls are a perfect backdrop and Mary is pleased with the overall result even if she did struggle with that most English of accessories, the Aga. ‘It’s always been diffi cult. In fact, I don’t leave it on during the summer but cook meat on a bbq outside and use the hob instead!’ The house is packed with original features including high skirting boards, cornice and six-panel doors. Even the servants’ bells remain. Hanging above the kitchen door they’re a gentle reminder of times-gone-by and still work, if extremely quietly. Upstairs the bedrooms are all decorated


luxuriously with pretty fabrics, bed linen and drapes. The master bedroom is a real highlight, painted in soft lilac shades that look wonderful in the morning sunlight. White woodwork ensures the room looks fresh while complementing the painted fi replace and pretty checked material of the window seats. A great collector, Mary uses one of the spare


bedrooms as somewhere to store her possessions. She has accumulated a wide range of ‘treasures’ while


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living in England and insists they will all return with her to America. She admits that, despite living all around the world, she enjoyed living in England most of all, even if she did fi nd our habits eccentric. ‘We always found it strange that English people kiss


you goodbye even if it’s the fi rst time you’ve met. Mind you, most are a great deal friendlier than they fi rst appear. We asked directions once, and the gentleman went out of his way to take us there personally.’ They love the English way of life and became


members of the National Trust, English Heritage and the Historic Houses Association. ‘I adore the old houses over here, especially those that are Regency in style. The small villages are quaint, there’s nothing like them in America. It’s been a wonderful time and the perfect end to a career. ‘It was quite hard to meet people at fi rst though,


because we don’t have children here or a dog and don’t go to the pub! Now we have plenty of friends, it’s time to leave! Our neighbours have made it so much more enjoyable.’ Dennis’ contract expires soon and Mary knows she will miss the house a great deal. Still she has boxes full of memories that will go back with her to America.


December 2010 – January 2011 | Traditional Homes & Interiors 39


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