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Home Ideas | Comfort & Luxury


ABOVE: Stour – A classic stripe design with a width of 140cms. 50% cotton 50% modacrylic, fi re retardant to domestic and contract standards and suitable for curtains and upholstery.


LEFT: Rochelle – Plain cotton velvet in an extensive choice of colours. 100% cotton pile, and is suitable for upholstery and curtains.


BELOW RIGHT: Genoa – Pictured in black, is available in both traditional, and a more contemporary interpretation. 100% silk, and is suitable for upholstery and curtains.


other focal features. Silk can also be used on curtains due to its light hang and fl uid movement, such as the Arcadia, perfect for curtains as the sheer fabric is interwoven so delicately it creates a fantastic shape. Distinguished by its diagonal weave,


twill has a plethora of uses within the home, and is commonly found in most upholstery due to its strong, soft and stain resistant properties. Twill compositions are particularly suited to upholstery, loose covers and often found in curtains due to their tight weave providing better insulation allowing for a cosy and toasty living room in these harsh winter months. Twill also allows you to create continuity throughout your house. Chester, a


lightweight twill cloth with a fi ne texture and body and excellent handle is available in an extensive choice of colours which affords you the luxury of creating curtains in the same colour as your bedding, or matching cushions. When deciding what fabrics to


introduce into your home it is also imperative to think about the colour scheme. It is common knowledge that velvet is best suited to fuller, brighter and warmer colours, compared to a twill which, composed of either wool or cotton lends itself to the whole spectrum of colours. Silks and silk damasks are similarly a lot more pronounced in their colours, a damask usually highlighting its fantastic


design with the blend of two colours. But regardless of the norm, the colour pallet of your home must match your accompanying objects. A rich upholstered velvet chair in an Oxford blue will not necessarily lend itself well to a contemporary room as much as it would in Sage green for example. It is also fundamental to consider the functionality and practicality of a fabric as a silk damask sofa would not tolerate as much wear and tear as mohair velvet. Historical buildings which seek to


recreate the original grandeur that once was, often opt for damask, or request a reconstruction of the original if they have a sample. An example of this can be seen in the recreation of the original reverse brocatelle effect 1870’s curtains which once hung in Cliffe Castle. Commissioned as part of the museum’s 50th birthday celebrations Northcroft Fabrics recreated the curtains by determining the yarns and weaves that were used and matching the colours as closely as possible from a single chair adorned in the fabric.


If you would like any more information on Northcroft Fabrics, restoration projects or to view their selection of fi ne fabrics, please visit www.northcroftfabrics.co.uk


ABOVE: Cliffe Castle – Grandiose gold curtains and wall coverings specially woven for Cliffe Castle to match their original furnishings. The fabric features a design of a peacock and a Chinese pheasant in a continuous tree and is woven from the fi nest quality silk and cotton as a reverse brocatelle with a raised background.


116 Traditional Homes & Interiors | December 2010 – January 2011 www.thimagazine.com


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