This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Comfort & Luxury | Home Ideas


LEFT: Chester – A twill cloth available in an extensive range of colours. 45% Cotton 45% Viscose 10% Linen, and is suitable for upholstery, curtains, blinds, cushions, bedspreads & throws.


RIGHT: Bougainville is an embossed fl oral design on modacrylic velvet, it repeats at 41cms and has permanent gaufrage. fi re retardant to domestic and contract standards and suitable for curtains and upholstery.


BELOW: Seville – Pictured in beige is an antique linen velvet with complementing embossed design Dampierre. 100% linen pile, and is suitable for upholstery and curtains.


BELOW RIGHT: Jean Bart – Pictured in Cardinal is a grand embossed design on modacrylic velvet, with a repeat of 67cms. 100% modacrylic, fi re retardant to domestic and contract standards and suitable for curtains and upholstery.


It is also important to consider which fabrics complement each other and what the overall effect is you are trying to create. Four of the most luxurious period


fabrics are silk, silk damask, velvet and twill. A mixture of practicality and opulence, these fabrics have the ability to instantly update and transform a room. But how should they best be utilised? Velvet, traditionally a symbol of wealth,


power and prestige over hundreds of years, has been re-emerging into fashion since the mid 1990’s and is available in compositions of cotton, linen, mohair, silk and modacrylic. Linen velvet, seen on the Seville is a fantastic luxurious fabric, ideal as shown in the upholstered furniture due to its hard wearing and practical properties. Mohair velvet is typically a heavy velvet suitable mainly for upholstery, unless you have windows such as those in Mr Darcy’s drawing room, which is complimented by long, heavy curtains. However, modacrylic


velvet such as the embossed Jean Bart pictured is a light weight hardwearing velvet, which drapes to make fabulous curtains exuding warmth and grandeur. Also suitable for upholstery, modacrylic velvet is available in grand embossed designs creating signature and stylish upholstery. Cotton velvets such as the Rochelle are available in extensive colour pallets suitable for both curtains and upholstery and is also the most affordable composition. A pile fabric that is cut into ‘tufts’, velvet is a very soft and comfortable fabric and is often used on sofas or scatter cushions to create a luxurious and warm focal feature in a living room or drawing room. Typically a warm shade, they display charm and character. Silks and silk damasks are also very


soft fabrics. It is also worth noting that there will be a textural difference in the silk, depending on whether it originated from India or China, this is due to the


extraction process of the silk from the silk worms cocoon. Damask is a term widely used to refer to the style of weaving, and is characterised by a background of lustrous fabric against which raised designs appear. Many pieces of antique upholstered furniture are covered in damask, which is how many consumers become acquainted with this fabric. A silk damask such as the Genoa, an original 17th century fabric design quintessentially Baroque in style with its ornate acanthus motif, and made from 100% silk, is commonly found on cushions, curtains and light upholstery. Damasks can be hard wearing, and soil resistant; Stamford and Stour, a luxurious co-ordinating damask and stripe, are woven from cotton and modacrylic, making them very practical and durable, and an ideal addition to a room that has character and personality. Usually found scattered around a room, silk and silk damasks lend themselves brilliantly to working in coordination with several


www.thimagazine.com


December 2010 – January 2011 | Traditional Homes & Interiors 115


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132