This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Mary Leslie was born and raised in Scotland. After graduating from the Inchbald School in 1980 she trained with Anne Charlton, and ran Nina Campbell’s Interior Design Department for 7 years. She founded her own company in


1996 specialising in Residential Interior Design. Most projects combine the best of traditional and contemporary design, and the company happily moves between both idioms to suit the client and the property. If there were such a thing as a Mary


Leslie ‘look’ it would combine a creative use of colour, form and function, sensitive to the client’s needs, aesthetically pleasing, practical, and supremely comfortable. The team on each project may include


architects, draughtsmen, lighting and audio visual designers, building contractors, curtain makers, upholsterers and all the other tradesmen and specialists who might be required. Each team is project specifi c and is compiled after discussions with the client and the appropriate team members. Everyone is committed to ensuring that we maintain the highest standards of creativity and fi nish. Mary’s work is predominantly in


the United Kingdom and range from contemporary London fl ats to traditional country houses. Recent overseas commissions have included a Chalet in Switzerland, a ranch in Oman, Villas in Lagos and a penthouse in Miami. Mary Leslie is a past Vice-Chairman of


the BIID (BIDA), past Chairman of the BIDA Charitable Foundation and a Professional Member of the IIDA. You can now read Mary’s blog: www.mhleslie.co.uk/ blog.html or follow her on Twitter: maryleslieID


Creating a Beautiful Home Sumptuous Fabrics


I recently wrote about natural fabrics such as wool and linen, as well as the lightest sheers and how to use them successfully in your home. Now I would like to turn your attention to my other favourites, which are the sumptuous fabrics, velvets, chenilles, damasks and brocades.


102 Traditional Homes & Interiors | December 2010 – January 2011 www.thimagazine.com


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