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OBITUARIES I Jesus College Annual Report 2010 137


moving north in 1972 to head theHistory department atNevilles Cross College, Durham, and retiring fromthis post in 1986 to fulfill another ambition to become a museumcurator.He returned to Leicester University for a course inMuseum Management and in 1992 became the curator of theMuseumof the Royal Engineers in Chatham, remaining until his retirement in 2001. During this time he oversawmajor expansions at themuseumand, in 1997, received on themuseum’s behalf theMuseum of the Year Award for industrial/social history.He held a commission in the Territorial Army, and as part of the then Royal Lincolnshire regiment, servedwithin the East Midlands UniversitiesOTC and later as 2nd in command in theNorthumbrian UniversitiesOTC.His research in local history had continued in the northwith the emerging BeamishMuseumand local LeadMiningMuseums inWeardale.His work on the history of the Royal Engineers formed part of theirMedal Rolls publications. However, hewas first and last a Yorkshireman. In 1961 hemarried Susan Croft and they had two sons.


ROBINSON, ArthurGeoffrey (1936) died onNew Year’s Eve 2009 aged 92. Geoffrey Robinsonwas born on 22 August 1917 in Lincoln.Hewas educated at Lincoln School before coming up to Jesus in 1936 to read English.Whilst at Jesus heworked conscientiously and took a full part in college life: he represented the College as a sprinter and hurdler and was secretary of the College literary society.His tutor described himas “amanwith ideas and ideals”.He graduated BA 1939 and returned to Cambridge in 1948 to take hisMAwhilst his brother Philip Robinson (1947) and cousin, Sandy Morris (1946)were in residence. In 1939 he joined the Royal Artillery and servedwith themuntil demobilisation in 1946. Subsequently he trained and qualified as a solicitor working originally in private practice before joining the Treasury Solicitor’s Department in 1954 where he remained until hismove to the Port of London Authority in 1962. In 1966, he becamemanaging director of the Tees &Hartlepool Port Authority serving the authority for 11 years before becoming chairman of the English Industrial Estates Corporation and subsequently he became chair of the British Ports Association and also chair of theMedway Port Authority.His distinguished service lead to himbeing appointed CBE in 1977. Hemarried PatriciaMacallister in 1943 and they had three sons and a daughter. Patricia died in 1971.Hemarried theHonMrs Treves in 1973.


RUNSWICK, Adrian Lester (1945) died on 17May 2010 aged 83. Adrian Runswickwas born on 2 January 1927 in Leicester.Hewas educated at Alderman Newton's Boys'Grammar School, Leicester, and after leaving school joined theQuaker ambulance service.He came up to Jesus in 1945 to read English, graduating BA 1948; MA 1952. Following graduation he began to study for a doctorate but two years into his work he left to become a teacher at the RoyalGrammar School,HighWycombe.We are grateful to his daughter, Katherine Runswick-Cole for providing the following information "Adrian found that he loved teaching and in 1955 becameHousemaster at HighWycombe.His careerwent fromstrength to strength: in 1960 he took up a post as head of English at University College School inHampstead and six years later, 1966, he becameHead of English at Trinity and All Saints College in Leeds.He later became Chairman of the Academic Faculty and finally retired in 1984.Hemoved to Staveley in


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